The Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire.

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The Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire.

Postby Snowhite » Thu Aug 30, 2012 12:55 am

Well I wonder what will happen to The Carnegie Library, when the New one opens, will it be left to go to wreck and ruin ?


I was in Dunfermline, Scotland earlier this month for a Wedding, it's a small town very much like Dun Laoghaire, It is Andrew Carnegie's birth place, unfortunately I didn't get to visit his Family Home while I was there, but did get to enjoy Pittencrieff Park (known locally as "The Glen") it was gifted to the people of Dunfermline by the millionaire and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie,

Carnegie built 2,811 free libraries in all. Of these, 1,946 were located in the United States – at least one in every state except Rhode Island -- 660 in Britain and Ireland, 156 in Canada. A handful of libraries were also scattered in places like New Zealand, the West Indies and even Fiji.


The Entrance to Pittencrieff Park, I might add this Park is always open to the public it is so clean and well kept, there are huge Fish in the little pond and they are never touched, don't think that could happen here....Do you ?


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Re: The Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire.

Postby Snowhite » Thu Aug 30, 2012 1:07 am

Think they put a show on for us in the Park when they heard the Irish were coming :D :D

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The Town Hall


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Re: The Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire.

Postby Jemser » Thu Aug 30, 2012 10:13 am

Hi Snowy,

Looks like a beautiful park and open at all times. The Town Hall also looks amazing, almost like a fairy tale Castle. You are so right about the facilities being unavailable in Dun Laoghaire, we can't even have one public loo open!!
Andrew Carnegie is a very interesting character and at the beginning of the 20th century he was estimed to be the wealthiest man in the world. Gave many millions to public charities. Anyway Dunfermline looks like a nice city, must pay a visit there sometime.

Hope you enjoyed the wedding :D

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Re: The Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire.

Postby Rocker » Thu Aug 30, 2012 5:56 pm

Snowwhite,

Such a lovely place. We never think of going to Scotland. Must put it on the list. As for the Carnegie Libraries. I spent my childhood in Blackrock library and wouldn't have had the chance to read so many books if it was not for that library.In our day the chances of having a book at home was slim.
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Re: The Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire.

Postby Strum » Thu Jun 30, 2016 4:54 pm

Shame about your imageshack photos Snowy. Arrrggghhh!

Anyway folks I'm trying to find some info on the Carnegie Library. I never knew it was donated "The site was donated by Lords Longford and De Vesci" So who was it donated to originally? The public or the local authority? Thanks. thumbright
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Re: The Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire.

Postby Rocker » Thu Jun 30, 2016 7:03 pm

That is a very interesting one Strum and I never knew the Lords donated the site. Details of registered lands are in the ~~Registry of Deeds ....now off to google to look up a few things

Gosh the registry of deeds site is interesting,

http://www.prai.ie/registry-of-deeds-services/

The Library appears to have been built 1910-1911

http://www.dia.ie/works/view/39314/buil ... IE+LIBRARY)
Last edited by Rocker on Thu Jun 30, 2016 7:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire.

Postby Snowhite » Thu Jun 30, 2016 7:07 pm

Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919) came from Scotland to the United States in 1848, and his family settled in Allegheny, Pennsylvania. At age thirteen, Andrew went to work as a bobbin boy in a cotton mill. He then moved rapidly through a succession of jobs with Western Union and the Pennsylvania Railroad. In 1865, he resigned to establish his own business enterprises and eventually organized the Carnegie Steel Company, which launched the steel industry in Pittsburgh. At age sixty-five, he sold the company to J. P. Morgan for $480 million and devoted the rest of his life to his philanthropic activities and writing. During his lifetime, Carnegie gave away over $350 million.

Many persons of wealth have contributed to charity, but Carnegie was perhaps the first to state publicly that the rich have a moral obligation to give away their fortunes. In 1889, he wrote The Gospel of Wealth, in which he asserted that all personal wealth beyond that required to supply the needs of one's family should be regarded as a trust fund to be administered for the benefit of the community.

His philanthropic interests centered around the goals of education and world peace. One of his lifelong interests was the establishment of free public libraries to make available to everyone a means of self-education. There were only a few public libraries in the world when, in 1881, Carnegie began to promote his idea. He and the Carnegie Corporation subsequently spent over $56 million to build 2,509 libraries throughout the English-speaking world.

Carnegie set about disposing of his fortune through innumerable personal gifts and through the establishment of various trusts. Each of the organizations established by Andrew Carnegie has its own funds and trustees and is independently managed. Carnegie had given money for libraries before, but he was now to devote himself to a philanthropic career, and it was not long before Ireland was to benefit. By early 1905 he had pledged $39,325,240 for 1,200 libraries in English-speaking countries, and of this money $598,000 was for Ireland. He (and his trusts) were to finance more than twice that number before the library building programme came to an end. Estimates of the number of libraries he paid for vary between 2,500 and 2,509. It was not only libraries that Carnegie was interested in; he endowed trusts for universities, the advancement of science, etc.. His wealth was so vast and increasing from the interest on the capital that he found it difficult to match his philanthropic schemes with the money he had. Between 1897 and 1913 he promised over £170,000 to pay for the building of about eighty libraries in Ireland. Sixty-six of the libraries were built and sixty-two of them have survived. Although the money that Carnegie gave for Irish libraries was small in proportion to his total expenditure it greatly helped the library movement in Ireland. In 1919, 81 per cent of the towns in Ireland which had rate-supported libraries received contributions from Carnegie. This compares with 65 per cent for Scotland, and 49 per cent for England and Wales.
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Re: The Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire.

Postby Strum » Thu Jun 30, 2016 7:26 pm

Wow what a man Snowy. Thanks for that. What I'm really trying to nail is if it was donated to the people or the council? Where I'm coming from is, I know it's a listed building but that doesn't stop the coco from selling to developers like what happened to the Cottage Home on Corrig Road.
So people will assume that it's a coco owned building but if the Lords donated it to the public isn't up to the public then to decide what happens to it?


Yep Rocker, I never knew that and it's interesting that the coco may be claiming it as theirs but it may belong to the public. Thanks for the help folks. thumbright
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Re: The Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire.

Postby Snowhite » Thu Jun 30, 2016 7:41 pm

Strum I will be in Scotland (Dunfermline) next week, Andrew Carnegie's birth place, his original home is a Museum I will try and find out more while I'm there but I'm sure my brother told me all Carnegie Library's are for the people and only to be used for the people, the last I heard about D/L was they were trying to have a Museum of Childhood ....Dolls, Teddy bears, Toys etc put in there which I think would be wonderful. But knowing our greedy councillors you never know. The Carnegie House is up for sale on Library Rd but not sure if it includes the original Building dontknow

http://www.irishtimes.com/business/comm ... -1.2115738
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Re: The Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire.

Postby Strum » Thu Jun 30, 2016 7:44 pm

Um interesting Snowy thanks. I'll be checking with the coco tomorrow, and if they try to fob me off I know a historian in the new Library. ;)
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Re: The Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire.

Postby Sinead » Thu Jun 30, 2016 8:22 pm

Strum:

You will probably find that the corpo have found a loop hole in the law which allows them to claim the building/land.
The lanes in Dun Laoghaire were the property of Longford and DeVesci estates but the Corpo claimed them a couple of
years ago and resurfaced them etc.

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Re: The Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire.

Postby Strum » Fri Jul 01, 2016 12:29 am

This is what I'm getting at Sinead, how can the coco "claim" them if they were left in trust to the people, loophole on not?
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Re: The Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire.

Postby Rocker » Fri Jul 01, 2016 8:33 am

Reading those bits about the Carnegie Trust it looks as if someone in whatever country had to apply to the Trust for funding. If Longford and De Vesci gave the land I wonder if they gave it to the Council who in turn applied to the Trust for the loan to build the Library??

Found this on Librarydetails.ie and it seems to indicate that there was a DunLaoghaire Rathdown librarian (1912)... :?: :?:
http://www.librarybuildings.ie/library.aspx?ID=94


A big aside......A man called Malcomsom from Belfast did an extensive study of some of the DeVesci papers and there is an interesting history of that part of the family on page 6-17 of this huge document.

http://www.nli.ie/pdfs/mss%20lists/De%20Vesci.pdf
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Re: The Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire.

Postby Zirco » Fri Jul 01, 2016 11:31 am

As a child I was a regular visitor to the Carnegie library at the end of Library Road.
Somehow, not sure how, a love of reading was instilled in me, books were a form of escapism, like the flicks. :D
I remember the Tarzan series of books by Edgar Rice Burroughs....great reads.
The Biggles books, Billy Bunter, The Famous Five.
And lots of crime books......
There were books around the house.....I particularly remember Newne's Pictorial Encyclopedia. I was captivated by the Greek mythology section.
Paperbacks about WWII, The Dambusters, Colditz. A book about the famine called The Great Hunger etc.
Books and comics provided hours of enjoyment.
:lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: The Carnegie Library, Dun Laoghaire.

Postby Toss » Fri Jul 01, 2016 5:50 pm

Strum wrote:This is what I'm getting at Sinead, how can the coco "claim" them if they were left in trust to the people, loophole on not?


I think you will find theres more than the DLRCC at it .... it was open season for years on the laneways of Dun Laoghaire (especially any around the areas named as part of a trust) and many residents just nibbled away as they extrended their gardens. I think even the ESB got in on the act by putting locked gates on the entry to some lanes (on the grounds of health & safety of course) :lol:
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