Snowy's Photo's

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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Sinead » Tue Sep 15, 2015 11:15 am

Tom Kettle has a niece living in Dun Laoghaire.
A lot of you will know her. Rosie Smith (nee Roe)
she lived in George's Place, a great worker for
the poor and down and outs in the town. Rosie
did all manner of courses during her adult life.
She is a lady true and true.

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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Snowhite » Tue Sep 15, 2015 11:47 pm

Harjoe wrote:Brilliant photos Snowey hope to get over next year to mark the 100 anniversary of my uncle's death 1st July 1916 Battle of the Somme



Harjoe, Hope you have your Hotel/B&B/ Guest House booked for the 1st July 2016, The Cententary is going to be huge, we are going back in May and were lucky to get rooms, also the prices are going up all the time.

Check out this Link.

http://somme2016.org/
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Snowhite » Tue Sep 15, 2015 11:57 pm

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I brought the Poppy Home with me from The Somme ;)
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Snowhite » Wed Sep 16, 2015 12:21 am

Christmas Truce, grass being reseeded so could'nt walk by the trenches......look how close they were :o sure they could have throw stones at each other ;)


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Gas Canisters :(
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I Love this picture, my Grandfather worked with the Horses during the war and I would love to think he is in it. 8-)
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Rocker » Wed Sep 16, 2015 9:35 am

More wonderful photos Snowy. thank you for posting. You are right about the hotel prices even last April they were sky high.
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Snowhite » Wed Sep 16, 2015 9:41 pm

Of all the Monuments this is my favourite" Vimy Ridge"

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This figure is called Mother Canada or Canada Bereft, representing the nation of Canada mourning for her dead.

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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Snowhite » Wed Sep 16, 2015 10:02 pm

Trenches at Vimy Ridge

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I have a terrible fear of going underground for anything but had to overcome it to see this. (I was sh##ing myself) but so glad I did ;) and they put the lights off for a couple of seconds while we were down there so we could imagine what it was like for the men...........feckin scary

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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Snowhite » Wed Sep 16, 2015 10:15 pm

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The Lochnagar Crater, at La Boiselle, is privately owned by Richard Dunning, having been bought in 1978 to save at least one of the original 1 July 1916 Somme craters from being filled in and built upon by local farmers.
The crater itself was caused by two charges of ammonal, of 24,000lb and 30,000lb.
It was blown along with 16 others at 0728 on the morning of 1 July 1916 as a two-minute precursor to the start of the offensive. The Lochnagar Crater measured 300ft across and 90ft deep (200ft wide and 81ft deep by 1919).

Debris from the explosion rose some 4,000ft into the air.
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Snowhite » Thu Sep 17, 2015 11:11 pm

Some local names on the WW1 Monuments.......Respect.....Lest we forget dnc2 9th (Service) Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers


8477 Private Pender, Joseph 9th Battalion In 1996 members of a Dublin Corporation house maintenance team were clearing out a derelict house in Blackrock, Co Dublin. Among the rubbish they found in the attic was a British army death certificate and a press cutting regarding a Pte Joseph Pender,. The date on the death cert was April 27 1916, the date of the gas attack at Hulluch. Joseph was 17 when he died. So too was Pte Paddy Byrne from 19 Summerhill in Dublin, who died alongside him.


27247 Corporal Michael ARCHBOLD 9th Battalion, Born Blackrock, Co. Dublin. Resided Blackrock Enlisted Dublin Killed in action 16th August 1917 in France Awarded Military Medal.


12533 Private Joseph BRADLEY Born Dublin. Son of Philip and Annie Bradley, of 11, Albert Place, York Rd., Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. Enlisted Dublin. 9th Battalion. Killed in action. 17th August 1917. Age 20. Potijze Chateau Grounds Cemetery


15134 Private Thomas BURTON. 9th Battalion Born Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. Enlisted Dublin. Resided Dun Laoghaire. Son of James Burton, of 55, Dominick St., Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin.. Killed in action 6th September 1916. Age 20. Thiepval Memorial


22374 Private Patrick CARTON 9th Battalion Born Blackrock, Co. Dublin. Resided Blackrock. Enlisted Dun Laoghaire. Son of William and Jane Carton, of 12, Brookfield Buildings, Blackrock, Co. Dublin. Killed in action 9th June 1917. Age 31. Menin Gate Memorial


23865 Lance Sergeant Thomas COFFEY 9th Battalion Born Cabinteely, Co. Dublin. Enlisted Dublin. Resided Dun Laoghaire. Son of Edward and Mary Coffey, of 1, Charlemont Avenue, Dun Laoghaire, Dublin; husband of the late Annie Coffey. Killed in action 16th August 1917. Age 30. Tyne Cot Memorial


18272 Corporal Patrick CONWAY 9th Battalion Enlisted Dublin. Resided Dun Laoghaire. Born Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. Died of wounds 28th April 1916


11290 Sergeant Francis DORAN 9th Battalion Enlisted Maryborough. Resided Monkstown. Born Monkstown, Co. Dublin. Killed in action 1st March 1917


9574 Private Keegan, Patrick. 9th Battalion b. Kingstown, Co. Dublin, e. Dublin, r. Kingstown, Killed in action, France & Flanders, 09/09/16


20471 Private Clarles LINTON, 9th Battalion.b. Blackrock, Co. Dublin, e. Blackrock,,Killed in action, France & Flanders, 09/09/16,
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Rocker » Fri Sep 18, 2015 12:21 am

Oh Snowy that relly brings it home. all those lovely local lads heading off to war, not really knowing what was ahead of them. They would have played together on the streets of Dún Laoghaire and Blackrock and here they were thrown together to die so far away.Lest we forget.

I knew Penders, Archibolds and Cartons from Blackrock, as they say, all old Blackrock names.
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby grammer » Fri Sep 18, 2015 12:17 pm

Very moving photos and information Snowy -
I would love to go visit some day .
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Snowhite » Sun Sep 20, 2015 11:05 pm

Two brother's killed within months of each other from Dun Laoghaire. :(

Private James Kelly, 1888, age 30, No 5 Coy. 1st Bat., Irish Guards, died on Monday September 14, 1914 and is commemorated on La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre Memorial, Seine-et-Marne, France. He was son of Peter and Mary Kelly, 34 Convent Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin.


Private Thomas Kelly, 1889, age 32, 1st Bat., Irish Guards, died on Monday November 9, 1914 and is buried in grave 1. L. 17, Poperinghe Old Military Cemetery, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. He was son of Peter and Mary Kelly, 34 Convent Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin.

(I will go see this grave in Poperinge in May)



Marshal Foch’s Tribute to the Irish Soldiers who died in the First World War.

PARIS, FRIDAY, Nov. 9th, 1928

THE Heroic Dead of Ireland have every right to the homage of the living for they proved in some of the heaviest fighting of the world war that the unconquerable spirit of the Irish race— the spirit that has placed them among the world’s greatest soldiers—still lives and is stronger than ever it was.

I had occasions to put to the test the valour of the Irishmen serving in France, and, whether they were Irishmen from the North or the South, or from one party or another, they did not fail me.

Some of the hardest fighting in the terrible days that followed the last offensive of the Germans fell to the Irishmen, and some of their splendid regiments had to endure ordeals that might justly have taxed to breaking-point the capacity of the finest troops in the world.

ON THE SOMME

Never once did the Irish fail me in those terrible days. On the Somme, in 1916, I saw the heroism of the Irishmen of the North and South, I arrived on the scene shortly after the death of that very gallant Irish gentleman, Major William Redmond. I saw Irishmen of the North and the South forget their age-long differences, and fight side by side, giving their lives freely for the common cause.

In war there are times when the necessity for yielding up one’s life is the most urgent duty of the moment, and there were many such moments in our long drawn- out struggle. Those Irish heroes gave their lives freely, and, in honouring then I hope we shall not allow our grief to let us forgot our pride in the glorious heroism of these men.

They have left to those who come after a glorious heritage and an inspiration to duty that will live long after their names are forgotten. France will never forget her debt to the heroic Irish dead, and in the hearts of the French people to-day their memory lives as that of the memory of the heroes of old, preserved in the tales that the old people tell to their children and their children’s children.

A GERMAN TRIBUTE

I know of no better tribute to Irish valour than that paid after the armistice by one of the German High Command, whom I had known in happier days. I asked him if he could tell me when he had first noted the declining moral of his own troops, and he replied that it was after the picked troops under his command had had repeated experience of meeting the dauntless Irish troops who opposed them in the last great push that was expected to separate the British and French armies, and give the enemy their long-sought victory.

The Irishmen had endured such constant attacks that it was thought that they must be utterly demoralised, but always they seemed to find new energy with which to attack their assailants, and in the end the flower of the German Army withered and faded away as an effective force.

“THEY NEVER FAILED”

When the moment came for taking the offensive all along our line, it was these same worn Irish troops that we placed in the van, making call after call on their devotion, but never finding them fail us. In the critical days of the German offensive, when it was necessary that lives should be sacrificed by the thousand to slow down the rush of the enemy, in order that our harassed forces should have time to reform, it was on the Irish that we relied repeatedly to make these desperate stands, and we found them responding always.

Again and again, when the bravest were necessary to delay the enemy’s advance, it was the Irish who were ready and at all times the soldiers of Ireland fought with the rare courage and determination that has always characterised the race on the battlefield.

"WE SHALL NEVER FORGET”

Some of the flower of Irish chivalry rests in the cemeteries that have been reserved in France, and the French people will always have these reminders of the debt that France owes to Irish valour. We shall always see that the graves of these heroes from across the sea are lovingly tended, and we shall try to ensure that the generations that come after us shall never forget the heroic dead of Ireland.
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Rocker » Sun Sep 20, 2015 11:53 pm

Snowy Thank you for posting that it is so sad. To think when the survivors eventually got home the political scene had altered so much they could not speak about their war and their friends who died.

Some of the flower of Irish chivalry rests in the cemeteries that have been reserved in France, and the French people will always have these reminders of the debt that France owes to Irish valour. We shall always see that the graves of these heroes from across the sea are lovingly tended, and we shall try to ensure that the generations that come after us shall never forget the heroic dead of Ireland.


In April when we drove to the little town in Belgium where my Great grand uncle is buried we met a warm welcome for the Irish whos soldiers had "helped our country". The graves are lovingly tended amd there I stood an Irish woman whose generations of family never spoke of British army service. I am so proud of the 500 or so from the Borough who gave their lives between 1914 and 1918. Lest we forget.
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby grammer » Mon Sep 21, 2015 1:26 pm

Thanks for the info. Snowy.
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby keeper » Sun Sep 27, 2015 8:37 pm

Been following your great photos and stories Snowy, during my working days I was lucky to be assigned many times to work on WW1 stories in all these places, so many memories stirred up by your photos. It is not until you are actually in these places that the enormity of it all hits you, unforgettable experience.Thank you Snowy.
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Sinead » Sun Sep 27, 2015 8:45 pm

Thanks for the photos Snowy. I have visited all of these cemeteries over the past 50 years
and have never failed to see the futility of wars. It is amazing to watch the changes
during this time and see the increase in interest in the war areas. In 1965 when my husband
took me to see some of the graves for the first time, there were no organised tours/trips, we
stayed in Brugge and a local person took us around. My husband had lived in the area for a
few months during his hitch hiking days and his interest was whetted during this time.

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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Snowhite » Mon Sep 28, 2015 10:02 pm

Thank's Keeper & Sinead,


Keeper
It is not until you are actually in these places that the enormity of it all hits you, unforgettable experience


That is so true :(







Maybe I've bored a few of you with these photo's dontknow so I promise this is the last two, first one is a photo of a postcard.


This memorial is dedicated to the men from Munster in Ireland who died in the Great War of 1914-1918.

The inscription on the memorial reads:

“IN MEMORY OF THOSE MEN OF MUNSTER WHO DIED FIGHTING FOR FREEDOM.

A TRIBUTE ERECTED BY THE PEOPLE OF THE PROVINCE AND CORK ITS CAPITAL CITY”

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100 yrs later

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The Munster War Memorial is located in a grassed area on the east side of St. Martin's Cathedral in Ypres
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Jemser » Tue Sep 29, 2015 11:18 pm

Keep on posting Snowy, I am really enjoying the photos, thanks for sharing them.
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Harjoe » Wed Sep 30, 2015 11:36 am

keep posting Snowy the photos are great .
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Snowhite » Mon Oct 05, 2015 10:30 pm

Anyone want to buy a Street Lamp


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Or a Urn or two

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Stag's/ Deer maybe

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Post Box from China ?

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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Jemser » Mon Oct 05, 2015 10:58 pm

Hi Snowy, I'll take one of the Post boxes please. :lol:
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby grammer » Tue Oct 06, 2015 12:22 am

top class photos Snowy-keep posting please-
Are those P 7 T :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: post boxes real???
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Rocker » Tue Oct 06, 2015 12:36 am

That is an amazing collection of stuff Snowy. I would love a deer or that boot scraper. We had one of those outside the old house in Blackrock. Better than any mat and we used to take our wellies off with its help.
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby keeper » Tue Oct 06, 2015 8:26 pm

Snowy ! Is that the builders recycling place in Kingswood ? The Gazebo looks familiar !
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Re: Snowy's Photo's

Postby Snowhite » Tue Oct 06, 2015 9:11 pm

Certainly is Keeper, my son brought me out to it, great stuff in it, I'd need a bigger garden for what I wanted ;) my son bought a set of eagles and a few other bits, the post boxes are from china :roll:
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