Sandycove

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Sandycove

Postby jordo » Mon Mar 31, 2008 10:02 pm

Sandycove
This Forum and the Internet continues to amaze me. Prompted by Snowhite and Toby’s excellent articles regarding the tragic loss of life at sea in or around our shores I went looking for any other such tragedies and found one that might be of particular interest as it concerns another Lifeboat Disaster.
This lifeboat, unnamed was launched from Sandycove Harbour and further reading about the history of this little harbour revealed information that was of particular interest to me.
We have been fortunate enough through the endeavours of my sister in law to have traced our family back to mid 18th century Lucan and they would appear to have been a well established family, numbers wise, on the lands of Lord Lucan and with family members marrying in the area we have links to a further eight families out there up to the 1860’s. For a probable reason that may be the subject of another Topic there appears to have been an exodus off these lands and in 1911 a mere two persons bearing any of the nine surnames are shown living in the region according to the census.
Birth records show that my G/Grandfather began his journey as a married man with one child out to the west of the Capital before crossing over to Dun Laoghaire. The first official recording of their existence in the town is of the birth of his third child Elizabeth in 1870 at, as opposed to in, Granite Hall a house completed in 1820 by the stone contractor for the Harbour Mr George Smith.
In 1960 necessary repairs were carried out to Sandycove Harbour particularly to its North Pier and the steps at the ‘Cove. The granite used in these repairs was from salvage of this large house so the next time you are down there think of my ancestors and the hardships they would have endured during their long trek South and then East as it would appear from the birth records that each time they moved my G/Grandmother, as well as nursing a child was already pregnant with the next.

We know from previous postings that Sandycove Harbour has the distinction of having the first lifeboat station in this Country built in 1803. The captain of this lifeboat in 1821 was Captain William Hutchinson. His report of the incident to the Port and Docks Board taken from the book The Forty Foot is as follows:

28th December 1821

Gentlemen,
I beg leave to state that on Friday evening between the hours of eight and nine o'clock I was informed by some of the Pilots that a Brig was ashore near Sandycove and that they would accompany me in the lifeboat to save the crew from a watery grave, their cries being most affecting. It blew a most violent gale from the south-east and on my arrival at Sandycove, numbers of men were ready to launch the Life Boat and with a volunteer crew of 14 men I embarked and with much difficulty reached the stern of the vessel where we received a hawser to hold by. At this time, the vessel was lying nearly head to the sea which broke completely over her and while the crew were in the act of getting into the Life Boat she filled with water. But perceiving our perilous situation the crew desisted. While we were bailing out the water with our hats, a sea of which I shall never forget the aspect, overwhelmed the Life Boat and washed six of us out of her. Two, fortunately caught hold of the rope they had been holding the boat by and three then unfortunately perished. With difficulty, I regained the Life Boat and with the remainder of her crew we were drove among the breakers without oars and most providentially we got on shore having received many contusions and the loss of another of my brave companions who from exhaustion let go his hold and was washed out among the rocks.
Two of the unfortunate Pilots have left widows and children who will be in a most desolate state without the humane grant of a small pension from your Honourable Board.
I remained on the beach all night for the purpose of rendering assistance; during the flood tide the violence of the sea had driven the vessel so high on the rocks that at low water we were able to get the crew out with safety.
The vessel's name was The Ellen of Liverpool with a valuable cargo.
I beg leave to subjoin the names of the men who assisted me.

The names of the Life Boat's crew on the evening of 28th December 1821:
Denis Mooney
Hugh Byrne (Drowned)
Thomas Byrne
John Byrne
John Archbald (Drowned)
Laurence Murphy
Thomas Fitzsimons (Drowned)
Thomas Grimes (Drowned)
Michael Mooney
William Rogan
Philip Cullen
Laurence Tallant
John Tallant.
Charles Archbald.

I wonder did the Board agree to the captains requst for a small pension for the dependants?
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Postby farmboy » Mon Mar 31, 2008 10:28 pm

Great piece Jordo, so sad that those men should lose their lives and as it transpired needlessly so. Your earlier reference to an additional post is rather intriguing, especially because the period you refer to (1860) is post famine.
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Postby Snowhite » Mon Mar 31, 2008 10:34 pm

Brilliant Jordo, jeez it's unbelievable that so many of these disasters took place so close to the shore ?????
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Postby grammer » Mon Mar 31, 2008 11:47 pm

hi jordo

thats news to me -gosh this site is becoming THE one to watch for the history of our area-- :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

congrats jordo top class info as usual
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Postby spudseamus » Mon Mar 31, 2008 11:49 pm

wow why wasent this the history we were forced to learn? and did they get a pension?? well done jordo
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Postby Strum » Tue Apr 01, 2008 12:59 am

Sad stories indeed. :-(
I was looking for a website I was on once that had detailed maps of all the wrecks in Dublin Bay. It was a diving site but I can't find.
I came across this drawing though. Theres no signature or date. Those buildings don't look anyway familiar though. (Colimore Harbour?)
Interesting picture.



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Copyright © 2006 Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
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Postby farmboy » Tue Apr 01, 2008 5:17 pm

Great find Strum, gives a real insight into what one of these storms must have been like. You,d have to feel sorry for what looks like two poor unfortunates atop the steamer on the right!
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Postby enviro500 » Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:07 pm

Gang, happy St April Fools Day


There's obviously been a lot of changes in the area. Looking at Strum's, line drawing above of a 'Kingstown' Storm or Tempest...

.one can clearly see the bell tower of Foxrock Curch with its "Tuscany" inspired bell tower. popping above the carnage at SColiemore ?
Gosh its hard to believe the sea came that far UP the hill to the N 11 !!!!

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Postby Strum » Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:28 pm

No way Enviro? That is very interesting. :???:
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Postby Snowhite » Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:42 pm

I thought it was maybe the Town Hall....... :???: as the Artist seen it ;-) would it not be more in the line of vision at that time.... :???:

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Postby Strum » Wed Apr 02, 2008 12:35 am

I think it's a really powerful drawing.
I see where the Artist has combined his/her interpretation of all the wrecks in the Bay into one drawing....
...and the feeble attempt of a measly few people hopelessly pulling the ropes trying to hold up a sinking ship...
Like I said, powerful.
I've searched a bit but just come up with the same drawing.
Can anybody else find anything about it?
Artist and date would be handy?


Enviro, I don't think Foxrock Church was there back in the messionic ages!

Snowy, I think it may be a lot older than the Town Hall Clock Tower?
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Postby farmboy » Wed Apr 02, 2008 8:02 pm

By a coincidence, I was just reading that St Michaels Church when built in 1824 originally had a rectangular tower. Doesnt look dead in "sync" with the landscape but these artists have a habit of putting things where it suits. Then again it could be a long gone building. It,d be nice if we could solve it.
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Postby Snowhite » Wed Apr 02, 2008 8:20 pm

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Postby Snowhite » Wed Apr 02, 2008 9:21 pm

Strum wrote:Sad stories indeed. :-(
I was looking for a website I was on once that had detailed maps of all the wrecks in Dublin Bay. It was a diving site but I can't find.
I came across this drawing though. Theres no signature or date. Those buildings don't look anyway familiar though. (Colimore Harbour?)
Interesting picture.










Was wondering is the Picture about this time in History ????????

In 1861 a huge storm wrecked 12 ships around the Kingstown coastline.I count 11 ships..........maybe the other had already sunk. :???:
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Postby jordo » Wed Apr 02, 2008 10:52 pm

From the book 'The Forty Foot'
During the terrible storm or Hurricane in (February, another source) 1861, when dozens of ships were lost, a brig called the Mary was wrecked on the rocks at the foot of Burdett Avenue. Ballygihen House, Gowran Hall???
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Postby grammer » Thu Apr 03, 2008 12:29 am

snowy /farmboy/ strum/ jordo
the drawing of the ship wrecks--

St Micheals church ----as Farmboy has suggested artistic freedom is probably right-fit everything in to the scene-to convay the story----

strum what do you think?
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Postby Snowhite » Thu Apr 03, 2008 12:35 am

jordo wrote:From the book 'The Forty Foot'
During the terrible storm or Hurricane in (February, another source) 1861, when dozens of ships were lost, a brig called the Mary was wrecked on the rocks at the foot of Burdett Avenue. Ballygihen House, Gowran Hall???


Ballygihen House was built in 1840 and on early maps it is show as Sandycove Lodge it over looked Scotsman's Bay, I got this info from Peter Pearsons Book "Between the Mountains and the Sea" there is also a print of both houses in the book, Jordo. ;-)
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Postby Strum » Thu Apr 03, 2008 12:39 am

grammer wrote:snowy /farmboy/ strum/ jordo
the drawing of the ship wrecks--

St Micheals church ----as Farmboy has suggested artistic freedom is probably right-fit everything in to the scene-to convay the story----

strum what do you think?



I think it's too low for a Church and not really the Architecture for a church...a bell tower maybe. I know what you're saying FB but the tower is very distinctive. What would I know anyway. :cool:
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Postby enviro500 » Thu Apr 03, 2008 12:55 am

Strum,
Its ok, it was a bit of tongue in cheek on my side as it was April 1st at the time .Can you imagine the sea shore at Foxrock !!!

Come to think of it the tower is similar to the one at Amiens St, Railway Stn in Dublin...that is DEFINITELY of Italian influence.

Dun Laoghaire Twon Hall was not constructed until about late 1880s and the picture depicted is a lot earlier.

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Postby Snowhite » Thu Apr 03, 2008 1:14 am

Strum wrote:
grammer wrote:snowy /farmboy/ strum/ jordo
the drawing of the ship wrecks--

St Micheals church ----as Farmboy has suggested artistic freedom is probably right-fit everything in to the scene-to convay the story----

strum what do you think?



I think it's too low for a Church and not really the Architecture for a church...a bell tower maybe. I know what you're saying FB but the tower is very distinctive. What would I know anyway. :cool:


Does anyone have Peter Pearsons Book If you have ....Have a look at page 99 St Patricks Church built in 1843 on a site above Bullock Harbour, it is very similar to the print........ ;-) so if you can imagine that your looking towards Dalkey instead of towards the Town would that be it........ :oops:
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Postby Strum » Thu Apr 03, 2008 1:41 am

C'mon Snowy, scan it! :shush:

Email him and ask. Everybody has been very obliging to me it the past about using material.
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Postby Sputnik » Thu Apr 03, 2008 5:11 am

I know this is stretching it a bit, but was there not a tower of similar appearance in the grounds of the Dominican Convent?
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Postby jordo » Thu Apr 03, 2008 9:03 pm

Snowhite wrote:
Ballygihen House was built in 1840 and on early maps it is show as Sandycove Lodge it over looked Scotsman's Bay, I got this info from Peter Pearsons Book "Between the Mountains and the Sea" there is also a print of both houses in the book, Jordo. ;-)


Thanks Snowhite,
I've been trying for that book in here since you first mentioned it on the Forum, did you notice if they had a copy?
I was in there a couple of weeks ago and it cost me a fortune, some great stuff on D/L.

Farmboy,
You are dead right, there is a direct link to the Famine (I think) Poor Laws were brought in and the Landlords were forced to pay a tax for the probable upkeep of their tenants. This fine gentleman is well documented on the Internet for his treatment of his people on the West Coast. Maybe it took until the 1860's before he got around to the Dublin ones, but I can find nothing yet.

Spudseamus,
You and me both, there is great stuff out there about our town and the general area that's all new to me. Had they taught it I wouldn't have spent my time looking out the window. Just found another one about a ship from Ringsend in the 1600's, great story and will put it up.
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Postby enviro500 » Thu Apr 03, 2008 9:21 pm

Strum,
I have the book "Between Mountains and the Sea" but the St Pats tower appears too tall and traditionally 'Brit' C of E design of the time.

I am of the opinion that it is not even Ireland but a dramatic 'Tempest 'picture of the Victorian era... any other suggestions ?

Enviro500
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Postby enviro500 » Thu Apr 03, 2008 9:24 pm

Jordo,
Re the book Between the Mountains and the Sea by Peter Pearson....

Go to the Peoples Bookshop, corner of Sussex St and Findlaters opposite Hicks.. ask for Johnny Goodbody and he will locate you a v.g used one
I deal there EVERY time I go to Ireland... Great service and very helpful

Enviro500
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