The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Our Roots, Families, past Generations etc...

The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby Rocker » Mon May 09, 2016 10:30 pm

I have always disliked the look of Loughlinstown Hospital. It is only in the last number of years that I discovered that the present day hospital was originally built as the Rathdown Workhouse. The Rathdown Poor Law union was declared on 8th August 1839. The Workhouse was erected on an eight acre site at loughlinstown.

Read the story here http://www.workhouses.org.uk/Rathdown/

The harrowing sentence for me is "the Workhouse was declared fit for the reception of paupers on 1st February 1841 and received it's first admission on the 15th March".

We would all like to think that the word "paupers" could not be associated with our families. Well, I was chastened recently when a family member read through the records of the workhouse and discovered many entries relating to the family from when they left Wicklow after the famine right up to the early 1900's.

I am starting to research the whole idea of the workhouse and it's place in our history and just though that members might have stories to relate.
I am not afraid of tomorrow, for I have seen yesterday and I love today.
William Allen White
User avatar
Rocker
Globetrotter
 
Posts: 6477
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:29 pm
Location: The Rock

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby keeper » Mon May 09, 2016 10:54 pm

My Grandparents hated the Hospital, they both died there in the end, but I remember them always referring to it as the Workhouse and always expressed the wish that they would never be put in there if they were sick because of its former use. The older people in Ballybrack told awful stories about it and they too always called it the Workhouse and never the Hospital, should have written them down at the time. It seems it left a mark on the older generation that I knew.
Great subject, I've been to a few around the country when working on Famine programmes.
User avatar
keeper
Somewhere over the rainbow
 
Posts: 1812
Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2011 8:52 pm

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby grammer » Tue May 10, 2016 12:29 am

Sad to say yes I remember too when I was young that people who went into the hospital only left by the back door.
But when my kids were young -it had a great A&E. always full of injured footballers at weekends :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
I do remember one night when my daughter was about 17 she had to go the A&E, some spacer was trying to kick in the main hospital front door=
It was a good hospital -but in the end -pushed aside by the big planners who still havent a clue about the real world.
sent from my PC and typed on a keyboard (old fashioned black colour) using three fingers
User avatar
grammer
The Spoon
 
Posts: 5330
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 12:30 am
Location: 7th rock from the sun

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby Sinead » Tue May 10, 2016 8:26 pm

The photo entitled Entrance Block is the old Maternity Hospital, my three children
were born there.
Sinéad
User avatar
Sinead
Skies are Blue
 
Posts: 2014
Joined: Sun Jan 31, 2010 4:09 pm
Location: Co.Dublin

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby Rocker » Wed May 11, 2016 9:55 am

The conditions in the Workhouse were grim,

see this report on Abandoned Ireland

http://www.abandonedireland.com/Workhouse.html
I am not afraid of tomorrow, for I have seen yesterday and I love today.
William Allen White
User avatar
Rocker
Globetrotter
 
Posts: 6477
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:29 pm
Location: The Rock

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby Rocker » Wed May 11, 2016 10:04 am

Details from the Dictionary of Irish Architects about the various buildings at Rathdown Workhouse,

http://www.dia.ie/works/view/40028/buil ... +WORKHOUSE
I am not afraid of tomorrow, for I have seen yesterday and I love today.
William Allen White
User avatar
Rocker
Globetrotter
 
Posts: 6477
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:29 pm
Location: The Rock

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby keeper » Wed May 11, 2016 9:51 pm

Very interesting links Rocker, thank you !
User avatar
keeper
Somewhere over the rainbow
 
Posts: 1812
Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2011 8:52 pm

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby Denis Cromie » Thu May 12, 2016 3:23 pm

Our first 2 were born there on recommendation of our family doctor and ,for whatever reason, he insisted that we should go to Holles Street for the following 3. Also one of our neighbours, who worked in the hospital services, told us not to go there when one of our youngest broke his arm.
User avatar
Denis Cromie
Ex-Chief Chocolate Enrober
 
Posts: 3049
Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2009 10:57 am
Location: Greystones

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby Rocker » Wed May 18, 2016 9:54 am

I want you all to put your thinking caps on and relate any stories you heard when you were small about the workhouse long ago.

I never heard any stories in my house and am now amazed when I look at the records and find my Great grandfather was in and out of Rathdown workhouse.Other than poverty what else was going on in the Boro was it general medical neglect??
I am not afraid of tomorrow, for I have seen yesterday and I love today.
William Allen White
User avatar
Rocker
Globetrotter
 
Posts: 6477
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:29 pm
Location: The Rock

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby skins » Wed May 18, 2016 12:47 pm

Don't think it would have been a popular topic of conversation, Rocker. Something that was feared and kept quiet, like asylums, and children born out of wedlock. Certainly not "in front of the children". Others may have a different view, though.
Skins
User avatar
skins
Executive Member
 
Posts: 956
Joined: Sat Aug 30, 2008 7:29 pm
Location: Arklow

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby Micheál » Wed May 18, 2016 2:38 pm

The workhouse was one of a long list of "unmentionables" that Irish families would never discuss.
Others included TB, pregnancy outside marriage, 'failed' priests, marriage breakdown, service in the British Army, mental illness, and so forth.

M.
User avatar
Micheál
Skies are Blue
 
Posts: 2525
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2011 12:13 am
Location: Within the sound of the Hooter

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby Denis Cromie » Wed May 18, 2016 4:34 pm

I would concur with Micheál and Skins,these issues were never discussed. Even children with disabilities would be hidden.
User avatar
Denis Cromie
Ex-Chief Chocolate Enrober
 
Posts: 3049
Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2009 10:57 am
Location: Greystones

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby Rocker » Thu May 19, 2016 1:54 am

Micheál wrote:The workhouse was one of a long list of "unmentionables" that Irish families would never discuss.
Others included TB, pregnancy outside marriage, 'failed' priests, marriage breakdown, service in the British Army, mental illness, and so forth.

M.


Gosh. Thanks skins, Micheál and Denis. I forget just how close mouthed it was in the Ireland of my childhood.
I love the list of unmentionables !we had the lot of those in both sides of our families (no failed priest though Ha). I remember "keeping up appearences" was the big thing in our family and we always put on the brave face no matter what was happening.
I suppose I am going up against a stone wall trying to discover how the ordinary hard working Joe/Josephine ended up in what was a gruesome place.
I am not afraid of tomorrow, for I have seen yesterday and I love today.
William Allen White
User avatar
Rocker
Globetrotter
 
Posts: 6477
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:29 pm
Location: The Rock

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby Sinead » Thu May 19, 2016 9:38 pm

In the last 19th/early 20th century a family by the name of Owens lived in
the gate house, Mr. Owens was employed there. His daughter lived in
Ballybrack when I moved here in 1971 and she was a friend of mine. A
family of the same name took care of the Dispensary and Clinic on
Patrick Street in Dun Laoghaire.

Sinéad
User avatar
Sinead
Skies are Blue
 
Posts: 2014
Joined: Sun Jan 31, 2010 4:09 pm
Location: Co.Dublin

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby Rocker » Thu Oct 20, 2016 9:43 am

The Workhouse keeps cropping up in my research on irishgenealogy. Not only did members of my family tree but near neighbours from Blackrock and DunLaoghaire and nearby Wicklow appear in the births and death records for the early 1900's. Whenever I see killiney as the heading I know I am going to find a record from the Workhouse. One thing...the workhouse authorities they were very methodical in giving the exact cause of death....Exhaustion was a recurring one!..sad to be exhausted and to have no recourse but to go to the workhouse...we are so lucky today.
I am not afraid of tomorrow, for I have seen yesterday and I love today.
William Allen White
User avatar
Rocker
Globetrotter
 
Posts: 6477
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:29 pm
Location: The Rock

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby grammer » Fri Oct 21, 2016 1:40 pm

Was'nt the Workhouse also a clinic and dispensary for the poor of the area.
sent from my PC and typed on a keyboard (old fashioned black colour) using three fingers
User avatar
grammer
The Spoon
 
Posts: 5330
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 12:30 am
Location: 7th rock from the sun

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby Rocker » Fri Oct 21, 2016 5:50 pm

I hope so grammer cause \I'd hate to think of my grandrelations being so poor t dhey died in the workhouse
I am not afraid of tomorrow, for I have seen yesterday and I love today.
William Allen White
User avatar
Rocker
Globetrotter
 
Posts: 6477
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:29 pm
Location: The Rock

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby grammer » Sun Oct 23, 2016 1:38 pm

I have at least one ancestor (on my Father's side of the family)that was born in the workhouse-
The 25th Nov. 1874.
Cant find any thing about him tho'--- :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:
sent from my PC and typed on a keyboard (old fashioned black colour) using three fingers
User avatar
grammer
The Spoon
 
Posts: 5330
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 12:30 am
Location: 7th rock from the sun

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby Rocker » Mon Jul 10, 2017 12:45 am

My visit to the Mormon church last week brought some joy but a lot of sadness too.
I had always known that my Gt Great Paternal grandfather had been in Wicklow jail for stealing food in 1846 (during the famine). I also found that his son aged 20 was in Wicklow jail in 1849 for stealing pieces of mutton and was given hard labour and was whipped' I often wondered how the wife and family of small children survived when the father was in jail. Well I found out my Gt great grandmother with a fever and at least three of her six children aged 8,6 and 1 arrived at the workhouse in Loughlinstown in January 1850. I assumed they walked from Glendalough as they are described as "dirty" in the record. All I could think of as I sat there crying was ...our poor people must have looked like the Syrian refugees when they struggled to the workhouse in their own county. a sad time in our history and a testament to the tenacity of those who went on to find a house and job and leave a generation of much better educated namesakes.
I am not afraid of tomorrow, for I have seen yesterday and I love today.
William Allen White
User avatar
Rocker
Globetrotter
 
Posts: 6477
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:29 pm
Location: The Rock

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby Sinead » Mon Jul 10, 2017 6:21 pm

Rocker, the term 'Irish Famine' makes my blood boil. There was lots of food in the country,
it was being sent to England. The poor God help them had no potatoes because of blight
why no one passed out some of the available food is a mystery. The population dropped
by more than half through deaths and the emigration of those lucky enough to have the
money. Like the Syrians etc., the Irish pooled their few bob and sent off the most able bodied
in the hope he/she would rescue the rest of the family. Man's inhumanity to man never leaves
us.

Sinéad
User avatar
Sinead
Skies are Blue
 
Posts: 2014
Joined: Sun Jan 31, 2010 4:09 pm
Location: Co.Dublin

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby masterblaster » Mon Jul 10, 2017 9:09 pm

Sinead wrote:Rocker, the term 'Irish Famine' makes my blood boil. There was lots of food in the country,
it was being sent to England. The poor God help them had no potatoes because of blight
why no one passed out some of the available food is a mystery. The population dropped
by more than half through deaths and the emigration of those lucky enough to have the
money. Like the Syrians etc., the Irish pooled their few bob and sent off the most able bodied
in the hope he/she would rescue the rest of the family. Man's inhumanity to man never leaves
us.

Sinéad



Is there a day passes when we don't come across people, young and old, begging on the streets of this country.Homeless, down and outs, and migrants to mention just a few.Many look upon these people as; chancers, good for nothing wasters, a blight on the landscape, how dare they sit and look pleadingly at us as we make our way for 'a few pints' or to the nearest store to rid ourselves of our hard-earned cash.Is there no end to them? how much longer have we to put up with these 'people'? God knows I've enough on my own plate! As for myself....well I'm as guilty as anyone, but, the more I watch the pictures coming from Syria, Palestine and yes even throughout our own country it's given me plenty to mull over.My road to Damascus perhaps!
masterblaster
Regular Member
 
Posts: 61
Joined: Sat Apr 26, 2014 7:53 pm
Location: southern cross rd

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby Sinead » Mon Jul 10, 2017 11:19 pm

Masterblaster:

You cannot give money to everyone who is begging but if you acknowledge them as
human beings you may be the only person they have spoken to in a while. Words
can be as good as a donation sometimes.

Sinéad
User avatar
Sinead
Skies are Blue
 
Posts: 2014
Joined: Sun Jan 31, 2010 4:09 pm
Location: Co.Dublin

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby masterblaster » Tue Jul 11, 2017 10:07 am

Sinead wrote:Masterblaster:

You cannot give money to everyone who is begging but if you acknowledge them as
human beings you may be the only person they have spoken to in a while. Words
can be as good as a donation sometimes.

Sinéad



Couldn't agree more Sinead!
masterblaster
Regular Member
 
Posts: 61
Joined: Sat Apr 26, 2014 7:53 pm
Location: southern cross rd

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby Rocker » Tue Jul 11, 2017 10:48 am

This is slightly off topic but is related to showing love for homeless people.
My most uplifting experience in the last few years was watching David Brophy and the High hopes choir on T.V.
I have since started going to the concert Hall to see any concerts in which David Brophy conducts and what a man. He epotomises christianity. He is as nice to the divas as he is to the homeless and you can feel the genuine vibe between the orchestra and the man.

This little clip of the choir appearing at the European Parliament is heart warming.

http://www.irishexaminer.com/examviral/ ... 82369.html

Oh! and David Brophy is now living in the Boro wuu wuu
I am not afraid of tomorrow, for I have seen yesterday and I love today.
William Allen White
User avatar
Rocker
Globetrotter
 
Posts: 6477
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:29 pm
Location: The Rock

Re: The Workhouse, Loughlinstown

Postby Sinead » Tue Jul 11, 2017 2:22 pm

Rocker:

David Brophy is a remarkable human being and is extremely humble.
Last year I heard him and his cousin on the radio one Sunday morning
and they were very funny. His cousin is an MEP!
The dignity he has given people is fantastic.

Sinéad
User avatar
Sinead
Skies are Blue
 
Posts: 2014
Joined: Sun Jan 31, 2010 4:09 pm
Location: Co.Dublin


Return to GENEALOGY



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest