Family History

Our Roots, Families, past Generations etc...

Family History

Postby jordo » Fri Oct 15, 2010 9:49 pm

The Irish Times are hosting "The Irish Genealogy, Family/Social History Experience in the RDS today :roll: tomorrow and Sunday from 11:00 AM - 6 PM. Admission €10:00 each day.
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Re: Family History

Postby MyLuck! » Sat Oct 16, 2010 10:22 am

http://www.backtoourpast.com/mysitecaddy/site3/
This link can get the tickets for €5

also children are free
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Re: Family History

Postby jordo » Tue Oct 26, 2010 2:49 am

When I started out on my quest to find my roots one thing I was given by one of those who had travelled the same road previously was an A4 copy of an area with an X marked on it. This, I was told marked the spot where the cottage in which my GG/Grandfather lived and my G/Grandfather was born. Two recognisable features of the map were a canal lock and a railway station.
Knowing that my ‘Dublin’ history began in Lucan It was easy to identify a possible location and I filed it away without ever giving it another thought. Both myself and MyLuck mentioned the Irish Genealogy Experience held in the RDS and the askaboutireland team gave a talk on Griffith’s Valuation which I attended. Now having an idea on how to use the Valuation and the accompanying maps I did a search and got a clearer idea of where the cottage once stood my GG/Grandfather being the tenant of a Mr Fitzpatrick (On the maps issue the original map is imposed over a more modern one and what once was a green field site can be easily transformed into a modern view of what is there now.)
Armed with the knowledge that he cottage was sandwiched between the railway and the canal in a triangular shaped field with the rail line acting as the base of the triangle I went out yesterday to begin my search. The area is pretty built up and I eventually located the rail line but found myself on the wrong side of the tracks with no access to the fields on the other side because of high fencing.

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The bridge over the railway was my next stop from here I had a good feeling that the field would be somewhere around the third pylon.

Image

My next stop was up at the canal. This is the 12th Lock from the city as the canal winds its way to the Shannon. Just as a by the way I was told that boats travelling beyond this point heading East are not covered by insurance, great little town we live in isn’t it.

Image

The road I had travelled from the M4 was the Lock Road and my walk down the canal, about two miles brought me to a new road unnamed on the map but I still could not find access to the field. The canal walk branches off onto what is known as the Kishoge Road or as previously known “the little wicker causeway” I could see why a wicker road was necessary as what is known as the aqueduct runs parallel to the canal as well as the area being criss crossed by streams. As you can see from this photo as well as having to ford the aqueduct I would have needed a chainsaw to get any further so I went home.

Image

Some might call it tenacity, others madness because my failure came between me and my sleep and I headed back out there this morning. I had visited the area again on Google Earth last evening and thought there might be a way in from the top of the Kishoge Road but this is as close as it brought me.

Image

Some of the land had been reclaimed and factories of sorts built. Any they I gained access to still left me with a 12 foot drop into the ‘unknown’ and I was on my way back towards the Lock Road when I saw a gap in a fence OK it meant jumping to the far bank but sure I’d come this far.

It’s amazing, up to this point I had taken over 40 photos but such was my excitement at having reached the other side that the camera stayed in my pocket where I had put it when making the jump. I walked through field after field changing my route many times as I tried to near the tracks, Down at ground level without land marks as the pylons were hidden by trees I thought I had missed my mark when I came across a ‘new’ road complete with cycle track. The road led to a covered in pedestrian bridge and although closed off to the public I knew it would give me the height to find my bearings.

This is looking back the way I’d come.

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And here was my goal, I was that close nothing was going to stop me now. I had two more streams to cross, the first was a jump and the second that little bit wider, luckily enough had a 7 X 2 plank spanning the abyss (well at my age it is an abyss RIGHT)

Image


Within minutes I started to find evidence of buildings long since demolished and another chapter closed.

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I may never find out when and why my family set up home in Lucan. I might never find out why my G/Grandfather left there and made the journey out to Dun Laoghaire but I do know that I stood where they stood that I walked the lanes and the little wicker causeway that they did and to me that feeling is priceless,
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Re: Family History

Postby Strum » Tue Oct 26, 2010 11:52 am

Tenacity is right Jordo. Great research and followed up.
Is that the very site of your Grandfathers house in the last one?

Fair play to you. :D
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Re: Family History

Postby farmboy » Tue Oct 26, 2010 9:36 pm

Your determination knows no bounds Jordo as I have witnessed several times from Aughavanna to Lehaunstown. 8-) I can well imagine how you felt standing among those stones.
Walter Mitty is NOT a figment of my imagination.
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Re: Family History

Postby Denis Cromie » Thu Oct 28, 2010 8:52 pm

I said it before and I'll say it again" You're some man for one man" jordo. Amazing. ;)
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Re: Family History

Postby Jacqui » Thu Oct 28, 2010 9:58 pm

A Man on a mission. :) That was very interesting...some journey. Well done Jordo. :) :)
Duty makes us do things well, but love makes us do them beautifully.
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Re: Family History

Postby MyLuck! » Sat Nov 06, 2010 12:48 pm

Well done Jordo!
There is a great feeling sometimes when you find the elusive piece!
I'm not sure I'd have walked so far in pursuit but... I hope you brought a small stone home with you!

I was stuck on one ancestor named CALDAY for a long while
She seemed to have appeared from nowhere and her family disappeared after a 4-5 year history
There were a couple of marriages and births in one parish around the 1850s and then nothing.
It seems that most of these ancestors could not read or write and that their names were written down by the locals who could.
I finally found Bridget's birth in the same parish in 1829 as GILDAY and in going through the parish records more relatives as GILDEA, GILLDAY, KALDEA, KILDAY, KILDAY, KILDEA, GALDAY....... I think there were a few more. It was like as if every time a new priest came to the church he spelt it his own way!!

I now know 30 of my children's 32 great-great-great grandparents - I decided I needed a goal!
I can go back further on one or two lines but I can't see much hope with Irish records of much more (at the present)

I was delighted with the information I gained here on this site for the Dun Laoghaire connection even if it seemed more Stillorgan/Bray in the long run.
I love popping back as you are all a big local family!!
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Re: Family History

Postby jordo » Sun Nov 07, 2010 8:11 pm

Thanks Guys, really worth the effort though.

Strum, the field is very recognisable on the map as is shaped like an upside down right angled triangle with the rail track forming the base. The other sides on the 1850’s are still intact as they are (now) ditches lined with birch trees. The total area contained by the three sides is less than an acre and the photo shows the rubble that is still visible so I can only hope. The pylons, luckily enough, are either side of the field so it seems to have missed any sort of development thankfully. The stone shown in the photo is mostly calp which is very local, it would have been great if it had been granite or limestone or something indicating it had been brought in but there was such a concentration in that one spot it has to have been some sort of a dwelling at one time.
MyLuck, it is our thanks to you as you have posted some very useful information for those of us tracing our family history. 30 out of 32 Wow that’s some achievement. I have still a long way to go with mine but like you am having problems with the misspellings of the surname. The other problem was some of the priests out in Lucan insisted on showing their command of Latin when recording names so that’s not helping either.

Yes I took some of the stone and also a bag of soil from the Site. My next stop is the Library in Lucan as I am still trying to find out why there seems to have been an exodus of sorts from the area around the 1860’s

Image
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Re: Family History

Postby MyLuck! » Tue Nov 09, 2010 7:33 pm

reminds me of
"He may be born in Germany but his feet will touch Irish soil first!"
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Re: Family History

Postby Strum » Tue Nov 09, 2010 9:41 pm

jordo wrote:why there seems to have been an exodus of sorts from the area around the 1860’s



Great stuff Jordo and fair paly to you for following it up so much. As to my quote, could it have been flooding?
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Re: Family History

Postby jordo » Wed Nov 10, 2010 9:59 pm

To be totally honest Strum I don't know. First thoughts were with it following on so soon after the famine it might have something to do with the poor laws which were introduced making land owners responsible for their tenents by paying a tax. I know it was fairly common on the West coast for tenents to be evicted around this time and the Lord lucan was one of the main culprits. Anyway, next stop Lucan Library, I will let you know how I get on.
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Re: Family History

Postby Gulliver » Mon Feb 04, 2013 8:07 pm

MURPHY'S LAW OF GENEALOGY

The public ceremony in which your distinguished ancestor participated and at which the platform collapsed under him turned out to be the scaffold at a hanging.

When at last after much hard work you have solved the mystery that you have been working on for two years, your aunt says, "I could have told you that."

You never asked your father about his family when he was alive because you were not interested in genealogy then.

The will you need is in the safe aboard the Titanic.

Copies of old newspapers have holes occurring only on the surnames.

John, son of Thomas the immigrant whom your relatives claim as the family progenitor, died on board ship at the age of 10.

Your great grandfather's newspaper obituary states that he died leaving no issue of record.

Another genealogist has just insulted the keeper of the vital records you need.

The relative who had all the family photographs gave them all to her daughter who has no interest in genealogy and no inclination to share.

The only record you find for your great grandfather is that his property was sold at a sheriff's sale of insolvency.

The one document that would supply the missing link in your dead end has been lost due to fire, flood or war.

The town clerk to whom you wrote for the information sends you a long handwritten letter which is totally illegible.

The spelling of your European ancestor's name bears no relationship to its current spelling or pronunciation.

None of the pictures in your recently deceased grandmother's photo album have names written on them.

No one in your family tree ever did anything noteworthy, owned property, was sued or was named in a will.

You learn that your great aunt's executor just sold her life's collection of family genealogical materials to a flea market dealer 'somewhere in New York City."

Ink fades and paper deteriorates at a rate inversely proportional to the value of the data recorded.

The thirty-seven volume, 16,000 page history of your country of origin isn't indexed.

You finally find your great-grandparents' wedding record and discover that the bride's father was named John Smith.

The family you are looking for will be on the last page of the unindexed (of course) census film that you check. However, if you begin at the end of the roll, they will be on page 1.

The microfilm that you have diligently searched page-by-page will have an index at the end.

All of your spouse's ancestors will be mentioned in county histories. None of yours will be.

If you need just one record, the microfilm will have page numbers. If you need 3 or more records, there won't be any page numbers and the records will not be in the proper order.

The book you need most will be out being rebound.

You will need item 23 on a microfilm roll that has 22 items. The rest of the film is continued on another roll that will not be in the drawer, and the librarian will tell you that it is "missing and presumed lost."

The records will end just before the entry you need. They will begin again two years after the date you need.

If one brother is left out of the genealogy of a family, guess whose ancestor he will be?

If there is a family history on one branch of the family -- it won't be yours.

The researcher you hired to read the original records at the courthouse will inform you that only the particular probate packet you need is missing.

After spending a week at Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, the worlds largest archive of family records, you finally find the book that will tell you about your ancestors ten minutes before closing time. Needless to say you have to return home and will probably never make it back to Salt Lake City again!
"Not all those who wander are lost" (J.R.R.Tolkien)
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Re: Family History

Postby Holla » Mon Feb 04, 2013 8:31 pm

:lol: :lol: Gulliver
All so true I think you can include me in a lot of the above :?
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Re: Family History

Postby Rocker » Mon Feb 04, 2013 9:16 pm

Gulliver,

Have you been following me around :lol: :lol: Nearly everyone of those applies!!!
I am not afraid of tomorrow, for I have seen yesterday and I love today.
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Re: Family History

Postby Strum » Mon Feb 04, 2013 9:27 pm

Wow, great to see these old posts resurrected. How to get Jordo back? Another apology?
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Re: Family History

Postby Sinead » Mon Feb 04, 2013 9:31 pm

Strum:
You are right, great to see Jordo's work resurected. He is one great
researcher. Don't know how he could be encouraged back but he is a loss.

Sinéad
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Re: Family History

Postby Snowhite » Mon Feb 04, 2013 9:40 pm

Yep Jordo always put a 100% into all his research, would be great to have him back on board.
Life isn't tied with a Bow, But it's still a Gift.
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Re: Family History

Postby Navanman » Mon Feb 04, 2013 9:40 pm

Not being smart but is Jordo Male or Female?


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Re: Family History

Postby skins » Mon Feb 04, 2013 9:51 pm

Navanman wrote:Not being smart but is Jordo Male or Female?

Male, as of last count.


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Re: Family History

Postby Navanman » Mon Feb 04, 2013 10:06 pm

Thanks Skins!

The wife often askes me "if I am a man or a mouse"

Depending on what she wants done I can be either :D :D



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Re: Family History

Postby Snowhite » Mon Feb 04, 2013 10:09 pm

Navanman wrote:Thanks Skins!

The wife often askes me "if I am a man or a mouse"

Depending on what she wants done I can be either :D :D



NM



:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: Family History

Postby Jemser » Mon Feb 04, 2013 10:25 pm

Sqeak up Navanman for God's sake sqeak up.
I spent a lot of money on booze, birds and fast cars. The rest I just squandered. - George Best 1946-2005
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Re: Family History

Postby Navanman » Mon Feb 04, 2013 10:53 pm

Very funny the lot of ye!!

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Re: Family History

Postby Dancer » Mon Feb 04, 2013 11:58 pm

I'd seriously love to trace my family history but I wouldn't know where to begin. It must be wonderful to be able to trace your roots
back through generations . I don't know what I looked like as a baby or toddler - that makes me sad... no photos anywhere. I do have a photo of me sitting on a pony in Dublin Zoo and I was probably about 5 or so but that's it :(
xx Dancer xx

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