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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Zirco » Sat Oct 03, 2015 7:36 pm

So.....as a child I did my fishing off the West Pier, down the steps someplace and sometimes from the back of the pier, the abundant seaward growing on the back was an issue though, however there were spots that were free of seaweed.
So, if you wanted to go fishing, you first needed to dig the bait. I finished work (after Eblana school from 4 to 6 in my grandad's shoe repair shop). My bike was parked outside the shop, or maybe I brought the bike out from the shop. I tied the garden fork to the bike, along the crossbar, started off, swung my leg over the saddle,,,,,eh, no, my leg (above the ankle) was impaled on a prong of the fork :roll: The bait digging expedition was called off. I got the wound dressed, then I cycled home. Later, my dad brought me to Monkstown hospital ON THE BIKE. I sat on the crossbar. It was the best transport we had, as a family. Wound dressed, trousers dropped, anti-tetanus injection, etc, back home on the bike....a little painful now. :roll:
I felt like a right eejit, the worst part was the fishing had to be postponed. :roll: Zirco
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Zirco » Sat Oct 03, 2015 11:01 pm

Rocker wrote:I go away for a week and a gret new member psots and has filled two whole pages of great stories. Welcome, Welcome Zirco.

Here is a bit of nonsence. My mother was always vague on her family details, her father had been an orphen reared by an Uncle Dick ( a bootmaker ) in Patrick's St. I always assumed it was surname Cummiskey. Then when the 1911 census came on line I searched for every Richard or Dick in Dún Laoghaire and found out it was a Dick Conway from Mulgrave Street....so we are not related!!!


Hi Rocker, Apologies, I just saw your post now, oops! Thank you for your kind welcome.
Shame we are not related......almost eh! :lol:
I am in learn mode, awed by so much treasure on this site. Zirco
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Rocker » Sun Oct 04, 2015 1:09 am

Zirco. Great story about the fishing and the almost fishing trip.

We were brought everywhere on the bike too. My Da had a friend in the Gas Company and got one of the big bikes cheap when they were selling them off. They were Orange!! There was a carrier on the back for my brother and a carrier on the crossbar for me. Like you the walking wounded were taken to Monkstown Hospital on the bike. No wonder broken arms didn't heal because before you would be brought to the hospital you were put up on the kitchen table and your face and hands wiped and your hair brushed...you couldn't let the doctor see how dirty you were....often our clothes would be changed and the broken arm well moved around!!! Ha...the children today would be ringing childline.
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Zirco » Sun Oct 04, 2015 11:05 am

Rocker wrote:Zirco. Great story about the fishing and the almost fishing trip.

We were brought everywhere on the bike too. My Da had a friend in the Gas Company and got one of the big bikes cheap when they were selling them off. They were Orange!! There was a carrier on the back for my brother and a carrier on the crossbar for me. Like you the walking wounded were taken to Monkstown Hospital on the bike. No wonder broken arms didn't heal because before you would be brought to the hospital you were put up on the kitchen table and your face and hands wiped and your hair brushed...you couldn't let the doctor see how dirty you were....often our clothes would be changed and the broken arm well moved around!!! Ha...the children today would be ringing childline.


A big orange bike :lol: That's a great image ....a big orange bicycle made for three :lol: It sounds like it was a heavy brute!
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Zirco » Sun Oct 04, 2015 11:24 am

The Story of the Conger Eel

One day I was down on Salthill beach,on a swimming trip..... tide was out and the rocks there were exposed such that you could walk out to them. However, the seaweed covered rocks had about a foot or so of water around them, kinda like a pool of water.
There was a man there in waders searching among the rocks for conger eel. He was armed with a gaffe, a long pole with a vicious hook on the end. Suddenly he was onto one. He chased the eel around the cluster of rocks trying to hook it with the gaffe. Eventually, after several minutes of this, he hooked the eel. There followed a battle of strength as the eel wedged itself in the rocks with the man pulling hard. Well, the fisherman finally gained the upper hand and dragged the exhausted eel onto the sand and we the onlookers could finally see his quarry.
It was a monster, about 5 to 6 foot long. No wonder he had such a struggle! The problem now was......how was he going to get it home? Well, one of the onlookers must have been his daughter, for he sent her home to get something. Some time later she duly arrived back with.......a pram :lol:
You've guessed it, the conger eel was put in the pram and wheeled home :lol: :lol: :lol:
I like to imagine his journey home...a neighbour comes along and stops to chat and look at the lovely baby. AAAAAAAGH
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: zirco
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Strum » Sun Oct 04, 2015 12:22 pm

Haha Zirco. I remember a guy from Glasthule used to fish for Congers off Bugrock. They sure were monsters alright! :)
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Micheál » Sun Oct 04, 2015 3:27 pm

Zirco wrote:The Story of the Conger Eel

One day I was down on Salthill beach,on a swimming trip..... tide was out and the rocks there were exposed such that you could walk out to them. However, the seaweed covered rocks had about a foot or so of water around them, kinda like a pool of water.
There was a man there in waders searching among the rocks for conger eel. He was armed with a gaffe, a long pole with a vicious hook on the end. Suddenly he was onto one. He chased the eel around the cluster of rocks trying to hook it with the gaffe. Eventually, after several minutes of this, he hooked the eel. There followed a battle of strength as the eel wedged itself in the rocks with the man pulling hard. Well, the fisherman finally gained the upper hand and dragged the exhausted eel onto the sand and we the onlookers could finally see his quarry.
It was a monster, about 5 to 6 foot long. No wonder he had such a struggle! The problem now was......how was he going to get it home? Well, one of the onlookers must have been his daughter, for he sent her home to get something. Some time later she duly arrived back with.......a pram :lol:
You've guessed it, the conger eel was put in the pram and wheeled home :lol: :lol: :lol:
I like to imagine his journey home...a neighbour comes along and stops to chat and look at the lovely baby. AAAAAAAGH
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: zirco


I saw a similar encounter on the West Pier back in the sixties. A congar had got stranded/ exposed in low water inside the harbour. The gad-hook wielding fisherman had no difficulty ensnaring the beast and it was duly tied to a plank before being dragged off to whereever it was bound.

What made the spectacle all the more interesting was that the 'fisherman' was none other than Donal Ó Moráin, a one time Govt Minister(?), head (?) of Geal Linn and chairman of the RTE Authority.
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Jemser » Sun Oct 04, 2015 7:58 pm

Zirco, thanks for that story, brought back memories for me of fishing for them while on the lighthouses. One lighthouse keeper in Inistearaght was very fond of conger and I would go down the 400+ steps to the landing and make my way across the rocks to catch them. They always liked fresh caught bait, so first was to catch something for bait, say a pollack, then cut it up. Bait the hook, which was attached to about three feet of wire trace (ordinary catgut was no good they would bite straight through it) and some heavy line onto that. They always loved the deep water, so drop it to the bottom and start jigging. Usually about ten minutes later you would get a bite, then you had to be quick to pull as hard and fast as you could upwards. If you weren't quick enough it would wrap itself around something and you would have one hell of a tussle. When you got it landed you had to stay well away from those razor sharp teeth trying to tear at you. Leave the conger and catch a few more pollack, glasson, ling, cod or something for dinner and them head back up to the lighthouse, about 400 feet back up those steps. There was always plenty of fish to be caught, but with all those steps a pram wasn't any good for getting them home. I do remember one lighthouse technician catching a very large pollack which he wanted to bring home with him, this happened on Rockabill. He was there for two weeks so he jammed it into the top freezer in the fridge. Two weeks later he tried to get it out but the door was slightly smaller than the freezer compartment, the head and tail of the fish were wedged behind both sides of the door. The freezer had to be taken apart as the helicopter was on the way to take him off. :lol:
Last edited by Jemser on Sun Oct 04, 2015 8:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Strum » Sun Oct 04, 2015 8:12 pm

with all those steps a pram wasn't any good for getting them home.



he tried to get it out but the door was slightly smaller than the freezer compartment, the head and tail of the fish were wedged behind both sides of the door



He chased the eel around the cluster of rocks trying to hook it with the gaffe.




You're conjuring up some very funny images, I'm picturing your descriptions. Conger Eel in a pram up 400 steps to the Lighthouse, now that's priceless. :lol:
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Zirco » Sun Oct 04, 2015 8:44 pm

Jemser wrote:Zirco, thanks for that story, brought back memories for me of fishing for them while on the lighthouses. One lighthouse keeper in Inistearaght was very fond of conger and I would go down the 400+ steps to the landing and make my way across the rocks to catch them. They always liked fresh caught bait, so first was to catch something for bait, say a pollack, then cut it up. Bait the hook, which was attached to about three feet of wire trace (ordinary catgut was no good they would bite straight through it) and some heavy line onto that. They always loved the deep water, so drop it to the bottom and start jigging. Usually about ten minutes later you would get a bite, then you had to be quick to pull as hard and fast as you could upwards. If you weren't quick enough it would wrap itself around something and you would have one hell of a tussle. When you got it landed you had to stay well away from those razor sharp teeth trying to tear at you. Leave the conger and catch a few more pollack, glasson, ling, cod or something for dinner and them head back up to the lighthouse, about 400 feet back up those steps. There was always plenty of fish to be caught, but with all those steps a pram wasn't any good for getting them home. I do remember one lighthouse technician catching a very large pollack which he wanted to bring home with him, this happened on Rockabill. He was there for two weeks so he jammed it into the top freezer in the fridge. Two weeks later he tried to get it out but the door was slightly smaller than the freezer compartment, the head and tail of the fish were wedged behind both sides of the door. The freezer had to be taken apart as the helicopter was on the way to take him off. :lol:


Ah, nice story, thanks for sharing......400 feet....yikes...you'd want to be sure you had everything afore you set off!
I'd love to hear about life in the lighthouse...did ye all get on?, what happened when you fell out?....was the light rotating on a bed of mercury, like the one in the maritime museum?, what shifts did you keep? Where is inishtearaght?...... pleeez dnc2
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Rocker » Sun Oct 04, 2015 8:50 pm

Have a look at this irish Lights site. That lighthouse is just off Dunquin in Kerry.

http://www.cil.ie/tourism/our-lighthouses.aspx
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Zirco » Sun Oct 04, 2015 8:58 pm

Micheál wrote:
Zirco wrote:The Story of the Conger Eel

One day I was down on Salthill beach,on a swimming trip..... tide was out and the rocks there were exposed such that you could walk out to them. However, the seaweed covered rocks had about a foot or so of water around them, kinda like a pool of water.
There was a man there in waders searching among the rocks for conger eel. He was armed with a gaffe, a long pole with a vicious hook on the end. Suddenly he was onto one. He chased the eel around the cluster of rocks trying to hook it with the gaffe. Eventually, after several minutes of this, he hooked the eel. There followed a battle of strength as the eel wedged itself in the rocks with the man pulling hard. Well, the fisherman finally gained the upper hand and dragged the exhausted eel onto the sand and we the onlookers could finally see his quarry.
It was a monster, about 5 to 6 foot long. No wonder he had such a struggle! The problem now was......how was he going to get it home? Well, one of the onlookers must have been his daughter, for he sent her home to get something. Some time later she duly arrived back with.......a pram :lol:
You've guessed it, the conger eel was put in the pram and wheeled home :lol: :lol: :lol:
I like to imagine his journey home...a neighbour comes along and stops to chat and look at the lovely baby. AAAAAAAGH
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: zirco


I saw a similar encounter on the West Pier back in the sixties. A congar had got stranded/ exposed in low water inside the harbour. The gad-hook wielding fisherman had no difficulty ensnaring the beast and it was duly tied to a plank before being dragged off to whereever it was bound.

What made the spectacle all the more interesting was that the 'fisherman' was none other than Donal Ó Moráin, a one time Govt Minister(?), head (?) of Geal Linn and chairman of the RTE Authority.


Excellent Micheál, Tks for sharing....very interesting story with a twist. :D
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Zirco » Sun Oct 04, 2015 9:04 pm

Rocker wrote:Have a look at this irish Lights site. That lighthouse is just off Dunquin in Kerry.

http://www.cil.ie/tourism/our-lighthouses.aspx


Tks Rocker, yes I see it now....looks like it's a good bit out from the mainland.....wow. The noise of the sea crashing near the lighthouse must have been loud. :roll:
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Strum » Sun Oct 04, 2015 9:05 pm

Zirco wrote:I'd love to hear about life in the lighthouse...did ye all get on?, what happened when you fell out?....was the light rotating on a bed of mercury, like the one in the maritime museum?, what shifts did you keep? Where is inishtearaght?...... pleeez dnc2



He has been writing the Book Zirco. I hope. ;)

There are many stories here about Lighthouses. Type Lighthouse into the search at the top right. ;)
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Micheál » Sun Oct 04, 2015 9:56 pm

My father told me two lighthouse stories . . .

The first a myth (?) which Jemser will confirm or dissolve.
Apparently thre were always 3 on site at any time. That way if one went beserk in such an isolated environment, there would be two more to defend each other. ("Beserk" may well have been a very loose term to describe all sorts of unwanted attention)

The second a joke, (told here previously but repeated for Zirco).
So theres this foggy night down at the harbour and the fog horn was activated by the keeper before he turned in for the night. Youd think the regular hooting would keep him awake but on the contrary, the rythmic sound helped him fall soundly asleep, until that is, there was a maffunction and the horn missed a sounding - whereupon the poor lighthouseman fell out of bed with the fright.

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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Zirco » Mon Oct 05, 2015 1:07 am

Strum wrote:
Zirco wrote:I'd love to hear about life in the lighthouse...did ye all get on?, what happened when you fell out?....was the light rotating on a bed of mercury, like the one in the maritime museum?, what shifts did you keep? Where is inishtearaght?...... pleeez dnc2



He has been writing the Book Zirco. I hope. ;)

There are many stories here about Lighthouses. Type Lighthouse into the search at the top right. ;)


Thanks Strum, I see what you mean :D
Jemser's photos are amazing.....I'm doing a digital photography course at the mo and would love to produce images like Jemser's. He certainly has the knack :D
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Zirco » Mon Oct 05, 2015 1:15 am

Micheál wrote:My father told me two lighthouse stories . . .

The first a myth (?) which Jemser will confirm or dissolve.
Apparently thre were always 3 on site at any time. That way if one went beserk in such an isolated environment, there would be two more to defend each other. ("Beserk" may well have been a very loose term to describe all sorts of unwanted attention)

The second a joke, (told here previously but repeated for Zirco).
So theres this foggy night down at the harbour and the fog horn was activated by the keeper before he turned in for the night. Youd think the regular hooting would keep him awake but on the contrary, the rythmic sound helped him fall soundly asleep, until that is, there was a maffunction and the horn missed a sounding - whereupon the poor lighthouseman fell out of bed with the fright.

M.


Brilliant, thank you Micheál.....lighthouses have a certain something about them that makes them attractive to me.
I remember the new Kish lighthouse when it was being built in D/L harbour. I was fascinated that they were building it there...well it was unusual I suppose. Felt a certain pride about it. However, am I correct in thinking the manufacture of it did not go well, there were serious issues that arose? Not sure.... dontknow
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Micheál » Mon Oct 05, 2015 8:45 am

Lots about the Kish on the site Zirco. Try the Search box.

In the meantime, heres something to whet your appetite . . .

Image

Heres a video . . .
http://www.britishpathe.com/video/lighthouse-on-tow/query/Dun+Laoghaire
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Strum » Mon Oct 05, 2015 10:26 am

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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Jemser » Mon Oct 05, 2015 4:10 pm

Zirco wrote:
Ah, nice story, thanks for sharing......400 feet....yikes...you'd want to be sure you had everything afore you set off!
I'd love to hear about life in the lighthouse...did ye all get on?, what happened when you fell out?....was the light rotating on a bed of mercury, like the one in the maritime museum?, what shifts did you keep? Where is inishtearaght?...... pleeez dnc2
[/quote]

Hi Zirco, looking at Rocker's link to the Tearaght, it appears to be nearer 300 ft of a climb. It just felt like 400 ft with a load of fish to carry up. Now I think of it I'm sure there were over 400 steps. It is a long time ago so the memory can play tricks. I was in the Engineering Department of the Irish Lighthouse Service so never spent more than four weeks at a time on a Rock, mostly two weeks or even a few nights. Yes many rotating lenses rotated on a bed of Mercury (nasty, dangerous stuff) and I was involved in the assembly of the light unit in the Maritime Museum. I spent just over six years in the Lights and left it in March of 1979. It was a time of great change in the job and automation had begun, at that time not many people left a good pensionable job. I remember my family were aghast, my Grandfather and Father, along with Uncles and Aunts on both sides of my family had served in the Lighthouse Service. I have written a few pieces on this site, it certainly does seem to be a very popular subject with many people. Thanks for the compliments on the photos and good luck with your photographic course. There are many good photographers on this site, I'm hopeful that in the future you will add many photos to the archive.

P.S. Just on Micheál's points, there is some story about Eilean Mór Lighthouse and three keepers disappearing around the turn of the last century. But I think the simple reason for three keepers was 8 hours on watch and sixteen hours off each day. On the foghorn wakening people up when it stopped, I was one of those people and I have mentioned on this site in the past. You get used to any sound and if you are tired enough will sleep through it. The Bull Rock was a very distinctive sound it was kind of BRRRRNNNNNNNNNNNN....UH. It was very loud, but eventually sleep would come and if it suddenly stopped during the night I would wake. Also once I was in a small hotel in India adjacent to one of the entry gates near the Taj Mahal, the temperature was very warm and there was only an overhead fan to cool the very basic room. When I turned this fan on, it was akin to having a helicopter in the room with me, however I slept through the night. When I awoke the next morning the fan (Helicopter) was still going strong and I was rejuvenated with sleep and ready to view the Taj.
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby grammer » Mon Oct 05, 2015 6:08 pm

Hi Zirco welcome aboard :roll: :roll: :roll:
Great stories -keep 'em coming wuu wuu wuu

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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Zirco » Mon Oct 05, 2015 8:31 pm

Strum wrote:
Zirco wrote:I'd love to hear about life in the lighthouse...did ye all get on?, what happened when you fell out?....was the light rotating on a bed of mercury, like the one in the maritime museum?, what shifts did you keep? Where is inishtearaght?...... pleeez dnc2



He has been writing the Book Zirco. I hope. ;)

There are many stories here about Lighthouses. Type Lighthouse into the search at the top right. ;)


Tks Strum, I see what you mean.....The Harbour Through the Years forum looks very good.....more treasure.....26 pages.....I'm on page three :D
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Zirco » Mon Oct 05, 2015 8:53 pm

Jemser wrote:
Zirco wrote:
Ah, nice story, thanks for sharing......400 feet....yikes...you'd want to be sure you had everything afore you set off!
I'd love to hear about life in the lighthouse...did ye all get on?, what happened when you fell out?....was the light rotating on a bed of mercury, like the one in the maritime museum?, what shifts did you keep? Where is inishtearaght?...... pleeez dnc2


Hi Zirco, looking at Rocker's link to the Tearaght, it appears to be nearer 300 ft of a climb. It just felt like 400 ft with a load of fish to carry up. Now I think of it I'm sure there were over 400 steps. It is a long time ago so the memory can play tricks. I was in the Engineering Department of the Irish Lighthouse Service so never spent more than four weeks at a time on a Rock, mostly two weeks or even a few nights. Yes many rotating lenses rotated on a bed of Mercury (nasty, dangerous stuff) and I was involved in the assembly of the light unit in the Maritime Museum. I spent just over six years in the Lights and left it in March of 1979. It was a time of great change in the job and automation had begun, at that time not many people left a good pensionable job. I remember my family were aghast, my Grandfather and Father, along with Uncles and Aunts on both sides of my family had served in the Lighthouse Service. I have written a few pieces on this site, it certainly does seem to be a very popular subject with many people. Thanks for the compliments on the photos and good luck with your photographic course. There are many good photographers on this site, I'm hopeful that in the future you will add many photos to the archive.

P.S. Just on Micheál's points, there is some story about Eilean Mór Lighthouse and three keepers disappearing around the turn of the last century. But I think the simple reason for three keepers was 8 hours on watch and sixteen hours off each day. On the foghorn wakening people up when it stopped, I was one of those people and I have mentioned on this site in the past. You get used to any sound and if you are tired enough will sleep through it. The Bull Rock was a very distinctive sound it was kind of BRRRRNNNNNNNNNNNN....UH. It was very loud, but eventually sleep would come and if it suddenly stopped during the night I would wake. Also once I was in a small hotel in India adjacent to one of the entry gates near the Taj Mahal, the temperature was very warm and there was only an overhead fan to cool the very basic room. When I turned this fan on, it was akin to having a helicopter in the room with me, however I slept through the night. When I awoke the next morning the fan (Helicopter) was still going strong and I was rejuvenated with sleep and ready to view the Taj.[/quote]

Hi Jemser, thanks so much for sharing, very interesting indeed. I hope Strum was correct and you are working on the book. Your experiences are priceless and should be recorded...so much has changed in the lighthouse environment...what you experienced was unique. There's something about lighthouses and the folk who manned / maintained them.
I'm looking forward to reading your posts in the near future. :lol: wuu
I am from D/L and worked on ships in the British Merchant navy for four years....so you see...I have a very good reason for appreciating the lighthouse service occasion14
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Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Zirco » Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:02 pm

grammer wrote:Hi Zirco welcome aboard :roll: :roll: :roll:
Great stories -keep 'em coming wuu wuu wuu

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I'm just back from Portugal and I am sick of fish BangHead BangHead BangHead BangHead BangHead
dontknow dontknow dontknow


Hi Grammer, Thanks for the welcome.......bacalhau, no thanks, grilled sardines, yes please :lol:
Oh sorry, no more fish for a while. :lol: :lol: :lol:
"Do not go gentle into that good night,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light".
Dylan Thomas
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Zirco
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Joined: Mon Sep 14, 2015 11:53 pm
Location: Came from Zircon, Multiverse to Dublin, Ireland, Earth, Multiverse

Re: Hi Everybody

Postby Denis Cromie » Tue Oct 06, 2015 10:14 am

Good man Zirco you've started to stir things up. wuu wuu
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Denis Cromie
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