Dun Laoghaire and the Austin Wolseley. Who would have known?

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Dun Laoghaire and the Austin Wolseley. Who would have known?

Postby Sputnik » Tue Jul 12, 2011 6:57 am

Wolseley, Frederick York (1837–1899)
by G. P. Walsh

Frederick York Wolseley (1837-1899), inventor, was born at Kingstown, County Dublin, Ireland, on 16 March 1837, second son of Major Garnet Joseph Wolseley and his wife Frances Anne, née Smith; his elder brother Garnet became Field Marshal Viscount Wolseley. He arrived in Melbourne in July 1854 in the Norwood and went to Thule sheep station on the Murray River. Here he worked for his brother-in-law Ralston Caldwell for five years before acquiring an interest in Thule and Cobram stations; by 1871 he had Toolong in the Murrumbidgee District. Financed by Garnet, about 1868 he began experiments on a machine for shearing sheep and by 1872 had evolved a working model which removed at least part of a fleece. He then visited England, Ireland, and possibly the United States of America, and on his return in 1874 resumed experiments in Melbourne with R. P. Park.

In 1876 Wolseley bought Euroka station, near Walgett in New South Wales; next year he joined the Union Club in Sydney. In the 1880s he was a sheep director for Walgett and in 1883 was involved in litigation over the ownership of Rosebank station. He continued testing his machine at Euroka and on 28 March 1877 he and R. Savage were granted a patent for a shearing device driven by horse power. A second patent was granted in December, but there were serious problems with the drive mechanism and physical limitations on the shearer's movements. On 13 December 1884 he and Park patented an 'Improved Shearing Apparatus' which included a cog-gear universal joint. In 1885 Wolseley bought the rights of John Howard's horse-clipper and engaged him as a mechanic at Euroka at £3 per week. Howard made several improved machines which worked so well during the 1885 season that Wolseley went to Melbourne and to form a manufacturing company and to arrange for public demonstrations, pitting the machine against the blades. Similar displays took place at Sydney and Euroka in 1886: Hassan Ali, a Khartoum native, used the appliance and Dave Brown was the blade-shearer. It proved superior and after William Ryley's suggestions for improving the hand-piece were adopted, the Wolseley machine was widely demonstrated in eastern Australia and New Zealand in 1887-88. In 1888 (Sir) Samuel McCaughey's shed at Dunlop, Louth, New South Wales, was the first to complete a shearing with machines. That year eighteen other woolsheds were fitted with the invention.

In 1889 Wolseley went to England and set up the Wolseley Sheep Shearing Machine Co. Pty Ltd in Birmingham and engaged Herbert (later Baron) Austin as foreman in his workshops at Goldsbrough, Mort & Co. Ltd, in Melbourne. Austin improved the overhead gear and in 1893 went to Birmingham as production manager. Wolseley resigned the managing-directorship for health reasons in 1894, and next year Austin designed and made the first Wolseley motor car.

Handsome, likeable and well built, Wolseley lacked practical mechanical experience and had to rely on others, but he was inventive and, above all, persevering; he has the honour of inventing the shearing machine which revolutionized the wool industry in Australia. He died of cancer at 20 Belvedere Road, Penge, London, on 8 January 1899 and was buried in Elmers End cemetery, Norwood, London. He left a widow but no family.

In 1901 Vickers Sons and Maxim Ltd took over the machine tool and motor side of the Wolseley works trading as the Wolseley Tool & Motor Car Co. Ltd. Austin was general manager until 1905 when he started the Austin Motor Co.
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Re: Dun Laoghaire and the Austin Wolseley. Who would have known?

Postby Denis Cromie » Tue Jul 12, 2011 9:52 pm

Great post Sputnik,no end to the talent of Dun Laoghaireites, :D
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Re: Dun Laoghaire and the Austin Wolseley. Who would have known?

Postby farmboy » Wed Jul 13, 2011 8:48 pm

Yes thats interesting Sputnik, he was buried in London, I wonder are his folks in Deans Grange? Plenty of titled people there.
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Re: Dun Laoghaire and the Austin Wolseley. Who would have known?

Postby grammer » Wed Jul 13, 2011 11:00 pm

great article Sputnik----
the world is /was a small place --
sent from my PC and typed on a keyboard (old fashioned black colour) using three fingers
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Re: Dun Laoghaire and the Austin Wolseley. Who would have known?

Postby Enviro500 » Sat Jul 16, 2011 10:56 pm

Hi Sputnik,

Good to hear you again. An interesting article indeed on Wolseley, I served some of my apprenticeship with R.W Archer & Co, the Sandwith St Dublin branch and the department which repair mechaincal handling equipment, Coventry Climax forktrucks, Liater Agri machines and Ford trucks. Among a busy section was sheep shearing equipment we repaired were Lister and Wolseley sheep shearing blades and cutters..so you see right up until 1966 the brand was still in business although Lister- Blacksstone and Wolselely were owned by Vickers-Armstrong Group....the rest is history. and eventually when Hawker Siddeley and Rover joined the Group, "Bloody Thatcher" sold it GERMANY for buttons !!!!!! Ah, sure its only Capitalism ...5

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Re: Dun Laoghaire and the Austin Wolseley. Who would have known?

Postby johndle » Sun Jul 17, 2011 2:13 am

Enviro,
I am going to drift a bit off (Topic) but I started an appenticeship as mechanic with Archers in Dun Laoghaire and I am trying to recall the Managers name ? He was a Magician Albert La Ba I think :? The first Gentleman I ever met in Real Life , a No Bullshit Man , said it as it was , I still go by the advise He gave me .
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Re: Dun Laoghaire and the Austin Wolseley. Who would have known?

Postby Strum » Sun Jul 17, 2011 4:17 pm

Great article Sputnik. Interesting alright. :D
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Re: Dun Laoghaire and the Austin Wolseley. Who would have known?

Postby Enviro500 » Sun Jul 17, 2011 4:42 pm

Johindle,

I was at Sandwith St/ Fenian St in 1963-5. Jimmy Duff was the service Manager and Mick O'Brien the Foreman. I think the Managing Director was a Mr Porter and was married to one of the Archer girls.They lived out Rathmichael way, if my memory serves me right, all a long time ago. but pleasant memories indeed...Incidently my first year;s weekly pay was £2.17.6d take home...I wonder if our younger scribes here can figure that out in Euros or modern Sterling.
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Re: Dun Laoghaire and the Austin Wolseley. Who would have known?

Postby grammer » Sun Jul 17, 2011 11:39 pm

Enviuro500


:D :D :D :D
a new member :D :D :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
whos that ????? :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
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Re: Dun Laoghaire and the Austin Wolseley. Who would have known?

Postby Enviro500 » Mon Jul 18, 2011 10:35 pm

GRAMMERIVITZ,
Its the POLISH version,

ENVUIRO TO BITS
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Re: Dun Laoghaire and the Austin Wolseley. Who would have known?

Postby Harjoe » Tue Jul 19, 2011 4:46 pm

Archers bring back great memories to me I remember when they first opened about 1957/8 I lived across the road from them and can remember the first Ford Angila with the sloped back window unveiled in 1959 they built a round kiosk for the petrol pump attendant who happened tobe a friend of mine previously there was just a small hut between the pumps but this was top of the range with windows and a door Eamon Gaines was the guy from Barrett Street who worked the pumps many years later he drove a bus for me right up until he died R I P.
I bought my second car from Archers in 1964 a square box type Ford Angila with three forward gears beige colour from Mr O Brien the salesman and the manager was Albert Le Bas who lived in Monkstown. it was my first car with traffc indicators front and rear before that my Morris Minor only had arms that came out between the doors with little lights on them, I had to wait until my next car anAustin A 40 before I got seatbelts great memories
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Re: Dun Laoghaire and the Austin Wolseley. Who would have known?

Postby Enviro500 » Wed Jul 27, 2011 10:03 am

Harjoe,

Archers attracted the 'celebs', Frankie Blowers the singer was a car salesman at Archers in Dublin and I worked there at the same time.

A lovely guy and he had a daughter called Linda and they lived near the Golf Links at the 'Barn Rd near the Farm roundabout.

I don't think he made old bones sadly...

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Re: Dun Laoghaire and the Austin Wolseley. Who would have known?

Postby Navanman » Sat May 26, 2012 10:22 pm

Does anybody remember a man called Wally that worked for years on the petrol pumps in Archers garage? I had a tricycle and brought it up to put air in the tyres (because I had seen the grownups do it) and there was an unmerciful explosion. The tube blew to bits. Wally came over to comfort me. All the other men thought it was very funny. So embarrasing.
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Re: Dun Laoghaire and the Austin Wolseley. Who would have known?

Postby Micheál » Tue May 29, 2012 12:48 am

Lots of stuff of an architectural nature on Archers Garage

http://www.archiseek.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=49&t=420&p=98459&hilit=Archers#p98459

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In the immediate aftermath of O'Callaghan knocking the original building, I took the opportunity of relocating several substantial work-related functions from his various hotels around the city by way of protest.
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Re: Dun Laoghaire and the Austin Wolseley. Who would have known?

Postby Rocker » Tue May 29, 2012 11:23 am

Thank you Miceál for posting this link. So much goes on I forget the destruction of so many interesting and beautiful buildings. Our Elders must be turning in their graves.

What I really like is your retribution. A man after my own heart. It took a brave man to be ethical in the nineties and noughties.
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