The Harbour Through The Years

The Port's Ferries Past and Present

Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Zirco » Thu Jan 21, 2016 12:00 am

Gulliver wrote:
Zirco wrote:Can I ask you re the Glasthule Quarry?.......
Was there a funicular section at the slope at the quarry entrance? :D :D :D

According to Rob Goodbody's book, "The Metals" the quarry variously called the Glasstool or Glasthule Quarry was the quarry in the spot where the People's Park now stands. There was a small spur of the Metals into the quarry, but there is no mention of a funicular element to it. Indeed, rather than having a problem of height, the quarry had a problem of flooding.
About 30,000 tonnes of rock were taken from here, representing 6.5% of the total required for the harbour.



Thanks very much Gulliver, very kind of you. wuu wuu
I was assuming the 'inclined plane to quarry' note on the Glasthule battery map indicated a downward slope into the quarry.
I was wondering how the trains negotiated this downward slope.
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Micheál » Thu Jan 21, 2016 7:48 am

Zirco,

'Normal' (traction) train wheels can negotiate a surprising range of 'grading' (slope) - as much as 10%. There are examples of 14% in Lisbon and Austria.

As long as there are no leaves on the line. :D

Its also concievable that a track serving the old Glasthule quarry was managed using a pully system ( from a fixed power source) like at Dalkey Quarry. That would allow for even steeper inclines.

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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Zirco » Thu Jan 21, 2016 12:06 pm

Micheál wrote:Zirco,

'Normal' (traction) train wheels can negotiate a surprising range of 'grading' (slope) - as much as 10%. There are examples of 14% in Lisbon and Austria.

As long as there are no leaves on the line. :D

Its also concievable that a track serving the old Glasthule quarry was managed using a pully system ( from a fixed power source) like at Dalkey Quarry. That would allow for even steeper inclines.

M.


Ah right, thanks Micheál. The scale of the work done to transport all that stone - I find it amazing. Hundreds of horses hauling hundreds of loaded wooden wagons down the metals......awesome! They were so good at engineering back then. wuu :lol:
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Sputnik » Fri Jan 22, 2016 8:50 am

grammer wrote:Came across this :lol: :lol:


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I only came across this post today. Thank you so much for posting it. I intend sending the link to the rest of my family, and particularly to my nieces and nephews scattered across the world. The loss of two family members was never forgotten in our home and my father took us down to the Memorial every Christmas Eve when we were kids. My sister continues the tradition.
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Rocker » Mon Apr 10, 2017 12:12 am

I hear there will be a big rememberence in Dún Laoghaire for the centenary of the sinking of the Leinster. Must get more details to post here.
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Rocker » Tue Apr 11, 2017 11:03 am

Thanks to Snowy I found out about this newspaper article. William Byrne (that great singer) founder of the "Friends of the Leinster" group is seeking relatives of those who were killed, injured or survived the Leinster disaster.

http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/se ... 09347.html
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Strum » Wed Apr 12, 2017 2:32 pm

Descendants of Passengers and Crew of RMS Leinster sought for Centenary Event.



http://coastmonkey.ie/descendants-passe ... ary-event/
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Rocker » Mon Apr 17, 2017 9:38 am

Love that portal picture about the Harbour Bicentenary.

On the Harbour company's site there is a press release of 22 March about the various celebrations.

http://dlharbour.ie/tag/bicentenary/

The Lexicon will have an exhibition on Level 4 from 15 May to 30 June. According to the blurb "this exhibition provides an account of the fascinating history of the pier in the past two centuries and has been researched by Colin and Anna Scudds of Dún Laoghaire Borough Historical Society. It will include numerous images from the nineteenth century up to more recent times"
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Strum » Tue Apr 18, 2017 5:48 pm

Rocker wrote:Love that portal picture about the Harbour Bicentenary.



I was wondering what the date 1817 meant Rocker, it's the Dunleary Harbour foundation stone laid. Anybody know where it is, or is it buried forever under the Pier??
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Rocker » Tue Apr 18, 2017 6:19 pm

Here is an interesting snippet from Ask about Ireland

The piers were built of rubble masonry by a technique of 'a pierre perdue' whereby the stones were thrown in and the action of the waves was allowed to consolidate the pile. All the stone for Dun Laoghaire was mined locally and a primitive funicular railway operated down from the quarries in Killiney. The rail trolleys were connected by a continuous chain and functioned by the force of gravity as the weight of the granite laden trolleys going down was enough to pull the empty trolleys up.

details
http://www.askaboutireland.ie/reading-r ... the-piers/

this is on the Harbour site
In May 1817, the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Earl Whitworth laid the foundation stone. It was
accompanied by a coin of the realm, ten previous days’ newspapers, and an inscription which
read; “In the hope that it may be the cause of life to the seamen, wealth to the citizen, Revenue
to the Crown and benefit to the nation”. After the ceremony a breakfast was served for three
hundred guests in a tent which had been specially erected near the new pier.


full downlaod http://dlharbour.ie/wp-content/uploads/ ... uction.pdf
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Micheál » Mon May 08, 2017 11:04 pm

We sometimes delight in pointing out ridiculous work practices in the world. But rest assured, this is not a particularly modern phenomenon. Not a Dun Laoghaire item as such but you'll enjoy this item I spotted from 1934 . . .

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And Paddy - true to his promise to Daniel O'Connell - didn't get to burn any "English" coal :D :D
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Rocker » Tue May 09, 2017 7:57 am

:lol: :lol: I'd say the Polish fooled them all and just turned around the cargo of Welsh coal and sent it to Dublin!!

"there yis are polish that off".
do widzenia!!
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Rocker » Tue May 09, 2017 8:03 am

Easons in Dún Laoghaire have a nice stand with Dún Laoghaire related books in a very prominent position. Aas well as Tom Conlon's great publication there is the Historical Society latest journal and Justin Merrigan's " Dun Laoghaire Holyhead 1826 - 2015: The Rise and Decline of Ireland's Premier Route". That will be my next purchase. It looks so good....I took a moment to read a bit while in the shop!! :D
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Rocker » Tue May 30, 2017 12:10 pm

Dun Laoghaire is set for a summer of celebrations to mark the Harbours 200th anniversary. The Dun Laoghaire Harbour Bicentenary Steering Group has announced its programme of activities to coincide with the milestone event.


The Opening Ceremony will be officiated by President Michael D Higgins & the groups Patron Minister Mary Mitchell O Connor on 31st May. Other featured events include an International Harbour Food Festival featuring over 25 unique vendors (5th & 6th June), a live Viking Invasion re-enactment with longboats as seen on the hit TV Show ‘Vikings’ (20th August) and The Kingstown 200 Classic Boat Race (8th July).
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Strum » Tue Jul 18, 2017 11:51 pm

Check this out folks. I recorded Will live a few days ago. Written by Will. Amazing. ;)


https://thewilliambyrneshow.bandcamp.co ... t-leinster


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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Rocker » Fri Aug 11, 2017 12:06 pm

Heard a very interesting interview this morning on Pat Kenny, Newstalk. He was talking to the sculptor Ronan Gillispie about a project for Hobart in Tasmania. They are going to erect a sculpture to the Irish women prisoners who went to Tasmania ostensibly as prisoners but were sold out as wives and "slaves" to help populate the country. Ronan Gillispie has been chosen as the sculptor. The sculpture will be ready in about October. One interesting fact which emerged in the interview is that the boats taking the women to Tasmania went from Kingstown yes Dún Laoghaire!!
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Rocker » Fri Aug 11, 2017 10:36 pm

Rocker wrote:Heard a very interesting interview this morning on Pat Kenny, Newstalk. He was talking to the sculptor Ronan Gillispie about a project for Hobart in Tasmania. They are going to erect a sculpture to the Irish women prisoners who went to Tasmania ostensibly as prisoners but were sold out as wives and "slaves" to help populate the country. Ronan Gillispie has been chosen as the sculptor. The sculpture will be ready in about October. One interesting fact which emerged in the interview is that the boats taking the women to Tasmania went from Kingstown yes Dún Laoghaire!!



On 2 September 1845, the convict ship Tasmania left Kingstown Harbour for Van Diemen's Land with 138 female convicts and their 35 children. On 3 December, the ship arrived into Hobart Town.
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Micheál » Fri Sep 01, 2017 9:34 pm

Are you sitting comfortably?

Plan to provide ‘floating homes’ in Dún Laoghaire harbour (today's IT)

Dún Laoghaire harbour in Dublin could soon be home to up to 50 houses on floating pontoons.

Under a plan put forward by the Dún Laoghaire Harbour Company, a site adjacent to Traders’ Wharf has been identified in which the houses would be built on concrete bases and set on pontoons.

Each house would have a floor area of 800 to 900sq ft (74.3 to 83.6sq m), roughly the same size as a two-bedroom apartment, and would have a capital cost in the region of €250,000 to €300,000, the company said.

A notice inviting private housebuilders with expertise in such projects to become involved in the project was published on the Government’s e-tenders website on Friday.

The company’s chief executive, Gerry Dunne, said the development would not be “an exclusive gated community for the privileged few” and would be aimed at those seeking “starter or retirement” homes.

The concept is modelled on similar water-based housing developments in Portland, Maine in the US and British Columbia in Canada. It is understood that planning permission will have to be sought from Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council for the development.

Floating boats have been used as homes in Britain and Ireland, notably St Katharine Docks in London and to a small extent at Grand Canal Dock in Dublin.

Nautical theme

However, the plan for Dún Laoghaire is for more traditional homes, possibly with a nautical theme.

Mr Dunne said the homes would be in a very sheltered area at the western end of the harbour, behind two breakwaters. They would be about 100m from the West Pier in an area close to the Quay fish shop. He said the development would not interfere with any existing harbour users.

The homes would be moveable but will “not be boats”, Mr Dunne said.

Following discussions about a floating hotel in the harbour last year, Mr Dunne said the concept of providing housing was a “natural extension of the discussion”.

Maintenance costs at the harbour, which consists of 200 acres of water space and 50 acres of land, are high and it has seen income fall since the Stena Line ferry pulled out in 2015. The company last year spent €1 million on repairs to the Carlisle Pier and further repairs are needed to the West Pier.

The company is also in discussions with an unnamed private entity on converting the former Stena ferry terminal into an office building.
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Rocker » Sat Sep 02, 2017 12:21 am

Gosh Micheál...I'm going to have to digest that!! We have moved from cruise ships to snooze ships....Imagine how ill I would be living on a pontoon...slurp slurp goes my coffee....
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Strum » Sun Sep 03, 2017 1:36 pm

Micheál wrote: The company’s chief executive, Gerry Dunne, said the development would not be “an exclusive gated community for the privileged few” and would be aimed at those seeking “starter or retirement” homes.




Oh really?
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Micheál » Thu Sep 07, 2017 4:01 am

This has to be the stupidest piece of " news" I've seen in years. It's no wonder the newspaper trade is going down the plug hole. Davy Stephens must be revolving in his grave - http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/rat-infestation-at-south-dublin-beauty-spot-causes-concern-36106220.html

What next? "Underwater Fish seen in Harbour?"


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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Sinead » Thu Sep 07, 2017 9:21 am

There have been water rats around the sea front since I was a kid. One of our pass times
was gathering stones, sitting on the rocks at the Green and seeing how many rats we
could hit! They are part of life in The Boro.

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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Rocker » Thu Sep 07, 2017 9:29 am

Have to agree with you Micheál. The newspapers have very little to write about this weather!!Anyway, the level of journalism is pretty low.
It is a well known fact that we are all just a few inches away from rats at any time. I have seen thousands of rats on all the rocks in every seaside area on the southside. They also run along the railway, run along the streets of the towns at night, sniff out black bags in every alleyway!!so we will have to get over the fact!!!...the little pests are also running up my pear trees eating the pears before we can get to them...and they are strong enough to drag a medium pear into their burrow!!...must call the newspapers with that exclusive :lol: :lol: p.s. I'd say the red fox problem is worser than the rat problem!!!!
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby Strum » Thu Sep 07, 2017 3:41 pm

Totally agree Michael. The rats have been at the back of the Pier since I was a kid so I' assume they've always been there, especially when the toilets were working. They're a good thing for the eco system and it's got little to do with construction because they're there anyway. The construction may rouse them out of their nests but it's not bringing them into the area. At the top of the article it states that "causing concern for swimmers" and at the bottom of the article it states that, this area of the pier is not used by bathers. Stupid article, unnecessary fear-mongering if you ask me.
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Re: The Harbour Through The Years

Postby bugrock » Thu Sep 07, 2017 11:40 pm

I still remember, when I was young, the big rats coming across the road from Bugrock into the houses along Newtownsmith. Never hurt anyone.
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