C.B.S. Eblana Avenue

Stories from Christian Brothers School, Eblana...

C.B.S. Eblana Avenue

Postby farmboy » Sun Oct 29, 2006 8:05 pm

One ot two of the Christian brothers were ok as were a couple of the lay teachers in this school, but I found the head brother here a bro. Davis could be a violent man. I got a full force belt of the back of his hand across the face one time for absolutely no reason.If that happened today the perpetrator would be lucky not to go to prison. They got away with it then the cowardly thugs.Happiest days of your life? the happiest day of mine was the day I walked out that gate knowing I would never have to see those people again. The one thing I will say is that they drummed education into you, I mean I can still remember lots of Latin I learnt over 35 years ago!Fat lot of good that is! Oh and the Gaeilge could come in handy if you were ever lost out in Clifden! As for the logarithms......
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c.b.s. Eblana

Postby farmboy » Mon Nov 06, 2006 8:50 pm

How many of us remember the sting of the "leather"? This form of punishment was administered(see they really taught us how to spell!) frequently and often for the slightest reason. Another sadistic thug(a "teacher") had a stick quite like a drumstick which he took great pleasure in using on some poor wretches. He took particular delight in aiming for the tips of the fingers so as to inflict the maximum pain. I,m sorry if these memories are not the most cheerful but why should I lie about them? If and when I can think of more cheerful aspects about this school I,ll post them. Oh, I,ve just remembered we had this Brother who at Christmas would buy these tiny presents for 5 or six of his "pets" and give them out to them in front of the class....a sick puppy.
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Postby spudseamus » Wed Nov 08, 2006 2:49 am

yep farmboy most of my memories are the same -- I went to St.John the Baptist in Blackrock--- we had a Mr.Cuncannon there and i think he was a brother to yer man you had lol -- always aimed either across the thumb or the finger tips and he called his stick "Nappertandy" and like you the best day was the last one ---out the gate and never looked back-- then it was over to Blackrock tech. and the girls!! whooooo! :bold:
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Postby farmboy » Wed Nov 08, 2006 8:15 pm

Lucky you Spud, never had the pleasure of being in a girls school(well not as a student anyway!) Maybe your missus could enlighten us but if memory serves me well we heard horror stories of lads being dressed as girls with bows in their hair by the nuns as a form of punishment. I,m nearly sure that was in the convent on Convent road but were there boys in that school?? If thats true its no wonder some of them ended up a bit warped. The clergy have a lot to answer for.
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Postby Sputnik » Wed Nov 08, 2006 10:32 pm

There were boys in the Convent up to 1st class. I went there from 1961 to 1965, then on to the Brothers. I cannot remember anyone being dressed up as a form of punishment.
I do remember being asked, every Monday, whether we had been to Mass on Sunday. If anyone said no they were marched from class to class to be humiliated in front of everyone.
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Postby farmboy » Thu Nov 09, 2006 10:20 pm

The nuns were to be feared in those days but having said that a lot of them are great people. I will see one tomorrow,Claire and she is the most down to earth person you could meet and full of fun. Like most modern nuns she doesnt wear the habit of old and I have to keep reminding myself that she is a nun!
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Postby Locko » Wed Nov 29, 2006 3:01 pm

I have many memories of Eblana, both the Primary and Secondary, and not all good. For the most part though, the teachers were okay, except for the sadistic few. In the primary, Br McAleer (alias McAqueer) was brutal; you'd have to get whacked with the side of a ruler across the thumb, 3 times before he'd let you go to the bathroom, and his other weapon of choice was the old leather. I also had Mr Martin in 3rd class maybe, and his favorite was a soccer ball that he kept in his desk; if he saw anyone sleeping or not paying attention, he'd keep talking, take the ball out and launch it at the unsuspecting kid, usually finding it's target on your head or face.
In the secondary, an old favorite ws Br "zip" Nolan. He was older than dirt, and we had him for religion and music. Our last class on a Weds was music and by then he was knackered and cranky as sin. We'd wind him up as soon as he'd come into class and he'd walk up and down the aisles just batterring the s..te out of us all. It's no wonder he hated kids.
We had another poor old fellah, Mr Doody, for Geography and History, and he was as deaf as a stick and wore 2 hearing aids. We gave the poor man hell, recording his voice and playing it back at full volume, and dying as he frantically looked around to see who was talking.
The head Brother, Keegan, was a bit of a b....x I remember breaking a window playing football in the yard, and when my old man refused to pay for it, I was a marked man. After that, my younger brothers ended up going to Marion.
There were some good teachers there in the late 70's early 80's, however, and some great characters. We had a science teacher whose name escapes me, but he was from the north, and he'd often come in smelling like a brewery, and looking like like he never went home. I remember Benny Roe trying to get through the facts of life in biology class, red faced, stuttering, and his legs twitching all over the place he was so uncomfortable. And Jimmy Breslin who looked so young he could have been in the desks with us. We must have been his first job, and we certainly toughened him up.
Lastly, I remember having my first and only woman (teacher that is!) at Eblana. No idea what her name was but she taught french, and we only had her for a couple of weeks before she fled the class one day in tears, and never came back.
The school was small and certainly lacking facilities that other schools had, but I think overall they did a pretty good job.
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Postby hayla » Wed Nov 29, 2006 5:27 pm

great piece of writing locko,, it seems you learned something there :D
keep posting 'cos this was really interesting even for a girl to read :hayla:
Image Never say never!!
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Postby enviro500 » Wed Nov 29, 2006 5:38 pm

Hi LOCKO,
Good stories, I was about 12+ years before you so the Teachers are different, except Seani Martin from the primary.
I kept in touch with him and as far as I know he is still in Clonkeen Rd. The man was tough, old school but fair. He actually taught at Eblana from 1943 until about 1981, his whole career. It must have been a rarity to stay in one school without transfer.

We had to do everything in Gaelic in his class, even English !!!!Ha, Ha. It was 5th class in 1959 and if you did not have a grasp then you were in the 'Gic', as we used say then. Fortunately I liked Gaelic .
He married a girl from Sallynoggin too. I called around to see him when home from England over the years at Deans Grange and it was a nice time, He gave me a few books ovr the years . In Irish, I might add, and the best was my last visit in 2003 when he gave me the Roll Book of St Michaels CBS FROM 1949 TO 1959 all hand written with all the fellas names in beautiful script. I still have that register as he saved it from a skip as C.B.S was shutting down. Perhaps someone of those years or near, like myself would appreciate it or better still go to a civic museum in Dun Laoghaire. I am sure my children, though grown up would not be interested in it. So any SERIOUS takers should have it back home with my compliments.

Enviro500
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Postby Locko » Thu Nov 30, 2006 4:03 pm

Thanks Hayla and Enviro.

That's wild to think that old Seani is still alive and kicking. I have to agree though, he was fair, and usually you only got what you deserved. I had forgotten about the Irish. It's amazing what memories come flooding back as I read other postings.
I remember the Brothers used to live over by the Royal Marine hotel, and they'd come to school together in a VW microbus. Closet hippies!
I did the Leaving in 1981, so we probably didn't have many of the same teachers, but others that come to mind are Podge O'Rourke who taught Chemistry and lived in the Noggin, a very nice chap. Also, another O'Rourke who we had for religion in 5th & 6th year, who was nuts; he'd curse like a trooper to get your attention and say things like " Jesus Christ came down off the f...ing cross".. He was always a great source of entertainment anytime we had a "concert" at the Boylan center. He'd get up and sing "Monto" and play the harmonica and be pelted with pennies.
Then we had Mr Burden I think, for english, who'd bore you to tears and "steal" your pens and pencils for his own kids.
Was the Tech Lane the place to settle an argument in your time? After any sort of altercation in the school yard, that would be broken up by a teacher, you'd hear the inevitable " your claimed, Tech Lane after school". We'd all congregate while 2 kids went at it before some local old dear would threaten to call the police.
Speaking of the Tech, I remember when it was the Art school, and was a great source of amusement, especially the night classes when they used nude models. It was hilarious to be feet away from the church, and fighting for a place on the window sill so you could peer in at women in various states of undress!
Those were the days.
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Postby enviro500 » Thu Nov 30, 2006 4:46 pm

Hi Locko,

Yes similar stories but your teachers were probably a lot easier that ours and by then kids almost had to read their rights before they were even touched, perhaps some midway solution should have been thought of and a least we would not have the total breakdown in discipline that there is today, particularly here in the U.K.

I just noticed that you are based in Buffalo N.Y.. I spent a week there in 1991 while visiting Toronto. My mate was in the RCMP in Ontario Province and based before his retirement in St Cathrines, Niagra Falls. His son was based in Buffalo and we had a great week there, bloody cold though.
My mate Jack now retired , to of all places, Portadown ,N.I where he met and married an Irish girl. He is from Leicester and joined the Canadian Police from the R.A.F, spending about 30 years in the job.

Hopefully a few watchers will hook up on the C.B.S site. They will no doubt have theit own tales. Funny enough we do not seem to have had much from the C.B.S Monkstown Park lads, except about a reunion or so, maybe its" the snob thing" ooops, what have I said !!!!!

Enviro500
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Postby Locko » Thu Nov 30, 2006 6:40 pm

Hi again Enviro,

we still had corporal punishment when I did my time at Eblana, and I'm not advocating it, but there had to be some "happy medium". Back then, if you were smacked at school, you'd never go home and tell your parents, because you'd get walloped again, because the teachers had the support of the parents. Nowadays, it seems that kids are completely pampered and sheltered (at least here, but I suspect back home too) and parents are too quick to jump on a teacher, rather than face the fact that their angel can be a little s..t. Teachers here are always afraid that if they say boo to a kid, there'll be a lawsuit. We as kids had much more respect for adults than today's kids, whether out of fear, or just that was the way you were brought up. Too many parents (at least here) want to be their kids best friend, and consequently there's no appreciation for age difference, and kids behave around adults just as if they were their peers.
Wow, I'm starting to sound like a Sean Fhear!

On a lighter note, I agree with the CBC Monkstown comment. We used to enjoy taunting them and called them Collie Dogs. It was amazing to think that so many of them were afraid of us just because we went to the non paying school.

gotta fly.......
Locko
 

Postby farmboy » Thu Nov 30, 2006 11:40 pm

Curiously enough I was only thinking about the lack of posts in the Monkstown college section before I read those last posts and although Locko was a good few years behind us ,we also called them Collie dogs! And we felt tougher than them which was probably not the case at all. I remember walking up through Carriglea Gardens at a time when it had a pretty bad reputation and being approached by a few of the local lads. They kinda threatened us till one of them musta recognized me and asked was my pop a brickie to which I replied yes. The rest of them were told to leave us alone as many of their dads worked alongside him on the buildings and that made us kinda like them! From then on we were free to come and go as we liked, a sort of "freedom of the city"!! :cool:
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Postby enviro500 » Fri Dec 01, 2006 2:03 am

Hi Farmboy,

That is amazing you talking about Carriglea Gdns, I my whole nineteen years of living up in the Farm, I never, ever went into Carriglea Gdns. We were told in no uncertain terms that if you went in there you were dead. One of the classmates Tommy Finn always said to come up but excuses were ALWAYS made, "Me Ma says I'm not allowed in case I GET MY CLOTHES TORN OR ETC" , YEAH,Yeah. God we were so brave ! Alas, by a coincidence I only found out TONIGHT that Tommy died recently.

This came out of another conversation with Snowhite's friend Anne via email. She mentioned in passing that she and others were producing a booklet on Dun Laoghaire and it was entered into a competition in December in Dun Laoghaire and wanted to use a picture of my collection from the old Dun Laoghaire site. In passing she mentioned that another contributor to the book, Seani Wallace from the Farm thought he knew me from C.B.S .

Well guys I almost fell down tonight when the phone went during dinner and guess who, Seani Wallace no less. we spoke for an hour
and caught up on a friendship that was last seen in Hammersmith in June 1971 when Seani was on honeymoon in London and came to visit. So through this site an old mateship was rekindled and lovely too, Seani by the way lives in the Loughlinstown/Ballybrack area and maybe some of you know this lovely guy. Seani was a neighbour of Spud's missus Mary.

And finally Farmboy hat I actually started to say to you was I hope we see some from CBS Monkstown Park ..Come on you 'well off' gits !!!

Enviro 500
And finally
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Postby Locko » Fri Dec 01, 2006 3:13 am

I ventured into Carriglea once when I was about 14, with 3 or 4 friends. We were taking a shortcut somewhere and were suddenly surrounded by a mob. I was singled out by one guy with an iron bar, and just as he was about to part my hair with it, some woman came out and saved my arse. Needless to say I never went back.

Speaking of the Collie Dogs, another favorite as a kid was to hide in the old cemetery next door, and scare the live out of younger kids. It was always overgrown and the perfect place to hide. If I'm not mistaken it's now been cleaned up?
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Postby Snowhite » Fri Dec 01, 2006 3:38 am

Like everywhere there's good and bad,most of the people that lived in carriglea were nice and you just had to know the one's not to cross.As a kid of about 12 i got a beating from one of the girls, so even then it was'nt only you lads that had to watch yourselves.Needless to say my brothers made sure it never happened again.Image
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Postby Sputnik » Fri Dec 01, 2006 6:21 am

York Road had the same, I believe undeserved, reputation as Carriglea. I think we all felt uncomfortable once we went outside our own immediate environment. We used to refer to Carriglea as Hollywood (don't know why).

Indeed, "Claimed, Tech Lane 4 o'clock" has been around for a long long time. Even my father mentioned it to me and he went to the Brothers in the late 20's.

Good to hear your stories, Locko. Did you ever go to Sodality? We used to give the sacristan a hard time. His name was Richie and he hadn't a blade of hair. Instead of singing 'Tantum Ergo, Sacramento", we used to sing 'Tantum Ergo, make Richies hair grow" and get a belting on the way out for our trouble. Fr. O'Hare would regularly fall asleep on the altar and we would all cough very loudly to waken him.
We were actually Monkstown parish, so weren't supposed to go to Dun Laoghaires school Sodality. However, my mother would write a note each year requesting that we attend. She always signed her name in Irish, and sure that worked all kinds of wonders with the Brothers.
Yes, they were harsh men. But the camaraderie of the school over-rode their ways.
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Postby Locko » Fri Dec 01, 2006 4:25 pm

Hi Sputnik.
I remember Ritchie well, as my brother and I were altar boys. I remember Fr. O'Hare falling asleep many times, and there was Fr Connolly I believe, who walked with a limp, and would give boring half hour homilies and put us all to sleep. After about 20-25 minutes, Ritchie would ring the bell telling the priest to stop and get on with the mass. He was the crankiest priest and once made my brother and I leave the altar during mass for messing and making eyes at a couple of girls up front. Our parents were at the mass too, so you can imagine what happened when we got home. One good thing about being an altar boy though was getting out of school to serve the 10am mass. The very first mass I served alone, was a big funeral, with the tricolor on the casket. Eamonn De Valera was there, and I almost wet myself I was so nervous. It worked out well though and I got a few bob for my troubles.
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Postby Avionic » Fri Dec 01, 2006 4:45 pm

I remember Richie, in fact he lived near me, (haven’t seen him around lately), but he looked just the same as when I was a kid. How come I’m getting older but all these people look the same. There was also a Fr. Moroney, I was never an altar boy but I believe he had a boat and used bring some of the lads out fishing.
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Postby enviro500 » Fri Dec 01, 2006 4:55 pm

Hi Locko,

Reading back on your amblings remined me of the SECCO and its dark days, I know I ramble on about Lofty Flynn and the bully he was. Seani Martin his colleague admitted that to me a few years ago.Brennie Rowe whose brother was the pet Larry who wrote our names on the 'Coloured' board when teach was out of the room. Brendan was a nice guy andmore outgoing than his brother. I am amazed to hear he turned out as a teacher, good luck to him. Both of the Rowes, I am sure were in the same class to gether but were not the same age, curious. Ah maybe Brennie was nearly as clever as Larry was, and believe me , HE WAS....I wonder what he is at now ?. The Rowes were from Dalkey ?

Getting back to Lofty, guess where he ended up............ in Marian College no less, so your siblings may remember him. His missus was Miss Flood from St Josephs Tivoli, a lovely girl. Lofty had some involvement with the Irish Basket Ball team of the time
enviro500
 

Postby farmboy » Sat Dec 02, 2006 12:47 am

Our favourite priest in Dun Laoghaire was Fr Martin and oddly enough he suffered from Sleeping sickness as well as Fr O Hare who I cant put a face to. Poor Fr Martin would fall asleep in the confessional and We,d be terrified that we wouldnt have had our confession heard,ah the innocence of it! By God when that man slept he was unconscious and it took a lot of loud coughing to wake him. One vivid memory I have of him is when I made my communion (maybe confirmation) and running down Sussex Street and him lifting me up in his arms. He moved out to Fairview parish and that seemed like the other side of the world. My brother and I were invited out to his house for tea and he met us in the city and then drove us back to the bus afterwards. I think that was the last time we ever saw him and a few years later we heard he,d died. A lovely man.
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Postby farmboy » Sat Dec 02, 2006 1:38 am

On the Subject of Carriglea gardens, a friend of mine from Ardmore park and another chap and myself used walk up from school in Eblana every day. When we,d hit Mounttown this other chap would mutter "see yez" and take off like a scalded cat up the road. He lived in Carriglea and sad to say he was so embarrased by it that he couldnt bear for us to see him going in there. I cant recall his name but he was a lovely quiet chap and we couldnt have given a tuppeny fig where he was from but that ritual went on for years. My mate and meself often met lads and girls from around there who would say things like " sure youse are only snobs". His dad was a taximan and mine worked in the building game all his life. Nothing too snobbish about that I wouldnt think!
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Postby Avionic » Wed Dec 06, 2006 2:11 am

Supplied lunch in Eblana... can anyone fill in the gaps..

Monday.............. Bread and Cheese
Tuesday............. Bread and ? Brawn ? or was that Thursday
Wednesday......... Buns
Thursdas ............ ??????
Friday ................ Bread and Jam

All with a small bottle of milk

I never got any of these as I lived near the school and went home for lunch. But in my memory I see big metal boxes (containing each days sandwiches) being delivered and left at the top of the stairs near the heads office.
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Postby Sputnik » Wed Dec 06, 2006 3:05 am

Monday: Cheese
Tuesday: Brawn, and later Prairie.
Wednesday: Currant bun.
Thursday: Brawn, and later Prairie.
Friday: Jam

The sandwich lady was Mary Hinch from Smyths Villas. Both of my older brothers delivered the sandwiches and milk from class to class but it never passed on to me.

Super treat: a bottle of lemonade and an ice-cream wafer the day after you made you Confo.
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Postby Avionic » Wed Dec 06, 2006 3:18 am

Sputnik

I think I received too many blows to the head, because I have no memory of my confo let alone any free handouts.

However I think you need to make enquiries as to what your brothers did that ruined your chances of getting that plum job on bun day especially.
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